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Randy Holloway has been shared in 18 public circles

AuthorFollowersDateUsers in CircleCommentsReshares+1Links
Glamor Retouching With Digital Make Up260photo, poto, foto, fhoto, photofunia, fotopunia, photo circle, photo community, photo group, photographer, photographer, potograper, potographer, foto circle, foto community, foto group, fotographer, fotographer, fotograper, fotographer, fhoto circle, fhoto community, fhoto group, fhotographer, fhotographer, fhotograper, fhotographer2014-03-17 05:00:41501318CC G+
Background Knockout68Photo, poto, foto, fhoto, photofunia, fotopunia, photo circle, photo community, photo group, photographer, photographer, potograper, potographer, foto circle, foto community, foto group, fotographer, fotographer, fotograper, fotographer, fhoto circle, fhoto community, fhoto group, fhotographer, fhotographer, fhotograper, fhotographer2014-03-12 03:13:225016615CC G+
Background Knockout68Photo, poto, foto, fhoto, photofunia, fotopunia, photo circle, photo community, photo group, photographer, photographer, potograper, potographer, foto circle, foto community, foto group, fotographer, fotographer, fotograper, fotographer, fhoto circle, fhoto community, fhoto group, fhotographer, fhotographer, fhotograper, fhotographer2014-03-12 03:12:34501329CC G+
Background Knockout68Photo, poto, foto, fhoto, photofunia, fotopunia, photo circle, photo community, photo group, photographer, photographer, potograper, potographer, foto circle, foto community, foto group, fotographer, fotographer, fotograper, fotographer, fhoto circle, fhoto community, fhoto group, fhotographer, fhotographer, fhotograper, fhotographer2014-03-12 03:12:085013410CC G+
Background Knockout68Photo, poto, foto, fhoto, photofunia, fotopunia, photo circle, photo community, photo group, photographer, photographer, potograper, potographer, foto circle, foto community, foto group, fotographer, fotographer, fotograper, fotographer, fhoto circle, fhoto community, fhoto group, fhotographer, fhotographer, fhotograper, fhotographer2014-03-12 03:11:285013310CC G+
Glamor Retouching With Digital Make Up0Photo, photoblog, photography, fotography. fotographiya circle, photography circle2014-02-28 06:32:02501002CC G+
Jonha Revesencio0A list of some of the must-follow programmers and geeks on Google+ #sharedcircles   #publicsharedcircles   #geeksongoogle  2013-09-13 15:45:18250000CC G+
Markos Giannopoulos5,491Geeks rule! // +CircleCount has added a new tag system (see announcement here http://bit.ly/15XaDov). Thousands of profiles have been tagged already, so here are the top (by number of followers) geek-tagged plussers (full list at http://bit.ly/134FoFN) The top ten: 1) +Robert Scoble 2) +Amanda Blain 3) +Darya Pino Rose 4) +Michelle Marie 5) +Brian Matiash 6) +Wick Sakit 7) +Joe Azure 8) +Keith Barrett 9) +Derek Ross 10) +Ahmed Zeeshan  For other rankings see also - Most popular geeks by comments/+1's/shares http://bit.ly/16SAddw- Most engaging geeks http://bit.ly/15XdZYm #circleshare   #circlesunday   #geeks  2013-07-21 15:19:0049018412CC G+
Sara Ataie23,050This is a very important Circle that I haven't shared at all.... Hope you enjoy it and find it as fun and interesting as I have!!! #Geek 2012-06-30 18:34:56493115CC G+
David D. Stanton5,770Here is my Geek's Circle: (Note I have just cleaned my G+ to try to remove inactive users.) Enjoy! 2012-06-25 08:47:49501012CC G+
Shawn Borelli0#FF and #CF Today I'd like to share my circle of Programmers and Developers. These people are responsible for our internet, software, mobile devices, and computers more accessible, user-friendly, reliable, and fun to use! A few of the people I work closely with include +Borelli Designs +CardCodez +Mike Hawk +Drew Salamone +Shawn Borelli Please comment if you're a Programmer and Developer not in this circle so that we can add you!Share this with your circles and extended networks!2012-01-06 15:12:46255000CC G+
Dylan Hunt0INTERNET NEWS MAKERSBloggers, Journalists, people who write and blog about Tech. Includes reporters from major news agencies, top ranked websites, and more. Google Plus's Top Internet News Makers.2011-11-04 01:07:36448414CC G+
Marius Voila183+Chris Porter Yes, you're right sorry about that...I'm correcting that right nowMarius Voilă shared a circle with you.2011-10-20 12:13:24500630CC G+
Jon Nellson33Geek CircleJon Nellson shared a circle with you.2011-10-16 15:23:13501765CC G+
hannah davis0here's a circle of computer geeks. see what you can grab from them!hannah davis shared a circle with you.2011-10-12 15:02:25495002CC G+
Robert Scoble161,698A circle of geeks (part II). Here's almost 1,000 active geeks. Programmers, developers, and highly technical people. Here's K-Z. Really great list of geeky/tecnical folks. Put them in their own circle so they don't overwhelm the folks you've hand selected. As always, if you find people who aren't active (a few have snuck through) or who aren't good, let me know and I'll remove them.Also, if you think you should be on the list, let me know! I'm still adding more.Robert Scoble shared a circle with you.2011-10-12 03:16:034941006360CC G+
0MICROSOFTMichael Gershman shared a circle with you.2011-10-04 00:28:2261210CC G+
Robert Scoble141,470This is another of my circles. This one is of programmers/developers and highly technical folks. I usually call this my "geek" circle. Unfortunately this one usually has 900+ in it, but using this new "share circles" feature I can only share 250. How it picks the 250 no one knows, but anyway this will be a fun starting place. I guess sometime soon I'll split up my circles into batches of 250 and share the whole thing.Hope you enjoy these.Robert Scoble shared a circle with you.2011-09-27 09:59:4925011289124CC G+

Die Top Beiträge aus den letzten 50 Beiträgen

Die meisten Kommentare: 2

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2011-08-12 06:34:24 (2 comments, 1 reshares, 2 +1s)

Great rant. Dylan Ratigan (rightfully) loses it on air

Die meisten Reshares: 3

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2011-07-16 22:54:29 (1 comments, 3 reshares, 5 +1s)

Really cool mash-up that I had never heard until today.

Die meisten +1: 5

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2011-07-16 22:54:29 (1 comments, 3 reshares, 5 +1s)

Really cool mash-up that I had never heard until today.

Die Letzten 50 Beiträge

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2013-02-16 02:39:31 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 0 +1s)

THIS!

THIS!___

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2013-01-05 03:25:30 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 0 +1s)

Check out this great photo sharing app!

Check out this great photo sharing app!___

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2012-12-03 04:34:51 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 2 +1s)

"If you need violence to protect your ideas, your ideas are worthless to begin with."

___"If you need violence to protect your ideas, your ideas are worthless to begin with."

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2012-12-03 04:32:41 (1 comments, 0 reshares, 2 +1s)

Reintroduced to this one over the weekend, what a classic.

Reintroduced to this one over the weekend, what a classic.___

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2011-12-03 17:54:46 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 0 +1s)

$55k a year selling M&Ms.

#1 sella baby... peanut M&Ms. don't be a haters... spend a dolla-dolla bill yo!

... what's your excuse? Exactly.

Get your hustle on or STFU!

we get money.... we get paid out here..... $300 kicks.

[ hat tip +Philip Kaplan ]

$55k a year selling M&Ms.

#1 sella baby... peanut M&Ms. don't be a haters... spend a dolla-dolla bill yo!

... what's your excuse? Exactly.

Get your hustle on or STFU!

we get money.... we get paid out here..... $300 kicks.

[ hat tip +Philip Kaplan ]___

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2011-11-26 20:52:56 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)

Fantastic article about Minneapolis that echoes what +Jennifer Pahlka of @codeforamerica said in her recent TedX Philly talk [video not posted yet] about the importance of cities in dealing with the problems that actually face most citizens:

“City governments are the last standing functional form of government in the United States and possibly the world,” says [Minneapolis Mayor] Rybak, who was 13 when he decided he wanted to be mayor.

I particularly loved this bit in the article:

"there is no Republican or Democratic way to pick up the garbage. And because you have to be able to perform. When somebody calls 911 and needs a police officer, you have to send a police officer. If a water line breaks in front of somebody’s house, it has to be fixed. It isn’t policy, it is doing the work. And that’s what city government is all about."

Of course,city gove... mehr »

Fantastic article about Minneapolis that echoes what +Jennifer Pahlka of @codeforamerica said in her recent TedX Philly talk [video not posted yet] about the importance of cities in dealing with the problems that actually face most citizens:

“City governments are the last standing functional form of government in the United States and possibly the world,” says [Minneapolis Mayor] Rybak, who was 13 when he decided he wanted to be mayor.

I particularly loved this bit in the article:

"there is no Republican or Democratic way to pick up the garbage. And because you have to be able to perform. When somebody calls 911 and needs a police officer, you have to send a police officer. If a water line breaks in front of somebody’s house, it has to be fixed. It isn’t policy, it is doing the work. And that’s what city government is all about."

Of course, city government is not without its problems. Unions, outdated procurement rules, and ignorance of the new possibilities of technology often leave cities behind the curve when it comes to 21st century services. And that's what codeforamerica.org is all about: getting smart technologists to give a year of service to help build 21st century services in cities that just want to do the job that their citizens need.

A big part of that is building services that help the people to help themselves. As Mayor Rybak says in the article:

“It would have been a lot of fun to be a mayor during the Great Society, where you could write a big fat check and make something happen,” Rybak says. “Now you have to bring your resources to the table. Very few mayors can solve any major problems on their own. You must bring what the city has to offer and inspire people from other levels of government, the private sector, business and residents to come together. There are close to 400,000 people living in 60 square miles here, and my job is to figure out a way to get them to do as much of the work together as possible.”

via +Andrew McLaughlin___

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2011-11-12 10:54:48 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 3 +1s)

‎"If your goal is to build a remarkable life, then busyness and exhaustion should be your enemy. If you’re chronically stressed and up late working, you’re doing something wrong."

‎"If your goal is to build a remarkable life, then busyness and exhaustion should be your enemy. If you’re chronically stressed and up late working, you’re doing something wrong."___

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2011-11-07 05:51:31 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)

Wonderful!

Wonderful!___

2011-11-07 01:10:25 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)

If you interested in the culture at Amazon or Jeff Bezos, enjoy.

Last week I accidentally posted an internal rant about service platforms to my public Google+ account (i.e. this one). It somehow went viral, which is nothing short of stupefying given that it was a massive Wall of Text. The whole thing still feels surreal.

Amazingly, nothing bad happened to me at Google. Everyone just laughed at me a lot, all the way up to the top, for having committed what must be the great-granddaddy of all Reply-All screwups in tech history.

But they also listened, which is super cool. I probably shouldn’t talk much about it, but they’re already figuring out how to deal with some of the issues I raised. I guess I shouldn’t be surprised, though. When I claimed in my internal post that “Google does everything right”, I meant it. When they’re faced with any problem at all, whether it’s technical or organizational or cultural, they set out to solve it in a first-class way.

Anyway, whenever something goes viral, skeptics start wondering if it was faked or staged. My accident was neither. While I have no proof, I can offer you what I think is the most convincing evidence: for the last six and a half years, I have never once ragged on Amazon publicly. Even just two months ago, in a keynote talk I gave at a conference, I was pretty flattering when I talked about my experiences there. I’ve always skirted any perceived shortcomings and focused on what they do well.

I still have a lot of friends at Amazon. In fact the place is chock-full of people I admire and respect. And up until now I have prided myself on my professionalism whenever I have talked about Amazon. Bagging on the company, even in an internal memo, was uncharacteristically unprofessional of me. So I’ve been feeling pretty guilty for the past week.

So. Without retracting anything I said, I’d like to paint a more balanced picture for you. I’m going to try to paint that picture via some true stories that I’ve never shared publicly. Nothing secondhand: it’s all stuff I witnessed myself there. I hope you’ll find the stories interesting, because it’s one hell of an interesting place.

Since Amazon started with Jeff, I’ll start my stories with one about Jeff.

Amazon War Story #1: Jeff Bezos

Over the years I watched people give presentations to Jeff Bezos and come back bruised: emotionally, intellectually, often career-ily. If you came back with a nod or a signoff, you were jumping for joy. Presenting to Jeff is a gauntlet that tends to send people back to the cave to lick their wounds and stay out of the sunlight for a while.

I say “presentations” and you probably think PowerPoint, but no: he outlawed PowerPoint there many years ago. It’s not allowed on the campus. If you present to Jeff, you write it as prose.

One day it came time for me to present to Jeff. It felt like... I don’t know, maybe how they swarm around you when you’re going to meet the President. People giving you last-minute advice, wishing you luck, ushering you past regiments of admins and security guards. It’s like you’re in a movie. A gladiator movie.

Fortunately I’d spent years watching Jeff in action before my turn came, and I had prepared in an unusual way. My presentation -- which, roughly speaking was about the core skills a generalist engineer ought to know -- was a resounding success. He loved it. Afterwards everyone was patting me on the back and congratulating me like I’d just completed a game-winning hail-mary pass or something. One VP told me privately: “Presentations with Jeff never go that well.”

But here’s the thing: I had already suspected Jeff was going to like my presentation. You see, I had noticed two things about him, watching him over the years, that others had either not caught on to, or else they had not figured out how to make the knowledge actionable.

Here is how I prepared. Amazon people, take note. This will help you. I am dead serious.

To prepare a presentation for Jeff, first make damn sure you know everything there is to know about the subject. Then write a prose narrative explaining the problem and solution(s). Write it exactly the way you would write it for a leading professor or industry expert on the subject.

That is: assume he already knows everything about it. Assume he knows more than you do about it. Even if you have groundbreakingly original ideas in your material, just pretend it’s old hat for him. Write your prose in the succinct, direct, no-explanations way that you would write for a world-leading expert on the material.

You’re almost done. The last step before you’re ready to present to him is this: Delete every third paragraph.

Now you’re ready to present!

Back in the mid-1800s there was this famous-ish composer/pianist named Franz Liszt. He is widely thought to have been the greatest sight-reader who ever lived. He could sight-read anything you gave him, including crazy stuff not even written for piano, like opera scores. He was so staggeringly good at sight-reading that his brain was only fully engaged on the first run-through. After that he’d get bored and start embellishing with his own additions.

Bezos is so goddamned smart that you have to turn it into a game for him or he’ll be bored and annoyed with you. That was my first realization about him. Who knows how smart he was before he became a billionaire -- let’s just assume it was “really frigging smart”, since he did build Amazon from scratch. But for years he’s had armies of people taking care of everything for him. He doesn’t have to do anything at all except dress himself in the morning and read presentations all day long. So he’s really, REALLY good at reading presentations. He’s like the Franz Liszt of sight-reading presentations.

So you have to start tearing out whole paragraphs, or even pages, to make it interesting for him. He will fill in the gaps himself without missing a beat. And his brain will have less time to get annoyed with the slow pace of your brain.

I mean, imagine what it would be like to start off as an incredibly smart person, arguably a first-class genius, and then somehow wind up in a situation where you have a general’s view of the industry battlefield for ten years. Not only do you have more time than anyone else, and access to more information than anyone else, you also have this long-term eagle-eye perspective that only a handful of people in the world enjoy.

In some sense you wouldn’t even be human anymore. People like Jeff are better regarded as hyper-intelligent aliens with a tangential interest in human affairs.

But how do you prepare a presentation for a giant-brained alien? Well, here’s my second realization: He will outsmart you. Knowing everything about your subject is only a first-line defense for you. It’s like armor that he’ll eat through in the first few minutes. He is going to have at least one deep insight about the subject, right there on the spot, and it’s going to make you look like a complete buffoon.

Trust me folks, I saw this happen time and again, for years. Jeff Bezos has all these incredibly intelligent, experienced domain experts surrounding him at huge meetings, and on a daily basis he thinks of shit that they never saw coming. It’s a guaranteed facepalm fest.

So I knew he was going to think of something that I hadn’t. I didn’t know what it might be, because I’d spent weeks trying to think of everything. I had reviewed the material with dozens of people. But it didn’t matter. I knew he was going to blindside me, because that’s what happens when you present to Jeff.

If you assume it’s coming, then it’s not going to catch you quite as off-guard.

And of course it happened. I forgot Data Mining. Wasn’t in the list. He asked me point-blank, very nicely: “Why aren’t Data Mining and Machine Learning in this list?” And I laughed right in his face, which sent a shock wave through the stone-faced jury of VPs who had been listening in silence, waiting for a cue from Jeff as to whether he was going to be happy or I was headed for the salt mines.

I laughed because I was delighted. He’d caught me with my pants down around my ankles, right in front of everyone, despite all my excruciating weeks of preparation. I had even deleted about a third of the exposition just to keep his giant brain busy, but it didn’t matter. He’d done it again, and I looked like a total ass-clown in front of everyone. It was frigging awesome.

So yeah, of course I couldn’t help laughing. And I said: “Yup, you got me. I don’t know why it’s not in there. It should be. I’m a dork. I’ll add it.” And he laughed, and we moved on, and everything was great. Even the VPs started smiling. It annoyed the hell out of me that they’d had to wait for a cue, but whatever. Life was good.

You have to understand: most people were scared around Bezos because they were waaaay too worried about trying to keep their jobs. People in high-level positions sometimes have a little too much personal self-esteem invested in their success. Can you imagine how annoying it must be for him to be around timid people all day long? But me -- well, I thought I was going to get fired every single day. So fuck timid. Might as well aim high and go out in a ball of flame.

That’s where the “Dread Pirate Bezos” line came from. I worked hard and had fun, but every day I honestly worried they might fire me in the morning. Sure, it was a kind of paranoia. But it was sort of healthy in a way. I kept my resume up to date, and I kept my skills up to date, and I never worried about saying something stupid and ruining my career. Because hey, they were most likely going to fire me in the morning.

Thanks to Adam DeBoor for reviewing this post for potential Career Suicide.___If you interested in the culture at Amazon or Jeff Bezos, enjoy.

2011-10-09 16:36:46 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 1 +1s)

(Sat01) What I Learned From Steve Jobs

Many people have explained what one can learn from Steve Jobs. But few, if any, of these people have been inside the tent and experienced first hand what it was like to work with him. I don’t want any lessons to be lost or forgotten, so here is my list of the top twelve lessons that I learned from Steve Jobs.

Experts are clueless.

Experts—journalists, analysts, consultants, bankers, and gurus can’t “do” so they “advise.” They can tell you what is wrong with your product, but they cannot make a great one. They can tell you how to sell something, but they cannot sell it themselves. They can tell you how to create great teams, but they only manage a secretary. For example, the experts told us that the two biggest shortcomings of Macintosh in the mid 1980s was the lack of a daisy-wheel printer driver and Lotus 1-2-3;another advic... mehr »

(Sat01) What I Learned From Steve Jobs

Many people have explained what one can learn from Steve Jobs. But few, if any, of these people have been inside the tent and experienced first hand what it was like to work with him. I don’t want any lessons to be lost or forgotten, so here is my list of the top twelve lessons that I learned from Steve Jobs.

Experts are clueless.

Experts—journalists, analysts, consultants, bankers, and gurus can’t “do” so they “advise.” They can tell you what is wrong with your product, but they cannot make a great one. They can tell you how to sell something, but they cannot sell it themselves. They can tell you how to create great teams, but they only manage a secretary. For example, the experts told us that the two biggest shortcomings of Macintosh in the mid 1980s was the lack of a daisy-wheel printer driver and Lotus 1-2-3; another advice gem from the experts was to buy Compaq. Hear what experts say, but don’t always listen to them.

Customers cannot tell you what they need.

“Apple market research” is an oxymoron. The Apple focus group was the right hemisphere of Steve’s brain talking to the left one. If you ask customers what they want, they will tell you, “Better, faster, and cheaper”—that is, better sameness, not revolutionary change. They can only describe their desires in terms of what they are already using—around the time of the introduction of Macintosh, all people said they wanted was better, faster, and cheaper MS-DOS machines. The richest vein for tech startups is creating the product that you want to use—that’s what Steve and Woz did.

Jump to the next curve.

Big wins happen when you go beyond better sameness. The best daisy-wheel printer companies were introducing new fonts in more sizes. Apple introduced the next curve: laser printing. Think of ice harvesters, ice factories, and refrigerator companies. Ice 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0. Are you still harvesting ice during the winter from a frozen pond?

The biggest challenges beget best work.

I lived in fear that Steve would tell me that I, or my work, was crap. In public. This fear was a big challenge. Competing with IBM and then Microsoft was a big challenge. Changing the world was a big challenge. I, and Apple employees before me and after me, did their best work because we had to do our best work to meet the big challenges.

Design counts.

Steve drove people nuts with his design demands—some shades of black weren’t black enough. Mere mortals think that black is black, and that a trash can is a trash can. Steve was such a perfectionist—a perfectionist Beyond: Thunderdome—and lo and behold he was right: some people care about design and many people at least sense it. Maybe not everyone, but the important ones.

You can’t go wrong with big graphics and big fonts.

Take a look at Steve’s slides. The font is sixty points. There’s usually one big screenshot or graphic. Look at other tech speaker’s slides—even the ones who have seen Steve in action. The font is eight points, and there are no graphics. So many people say that Steve was the world’s greatest product introduction guy..don’t you wonder why more people don’t copy his style?

Changing your mind is a sign of intelligence.

When Apple first shipped the iPhone there was no such thing as apps. Apps, Steve decreed, were a bad thing because you never know what they could be doing to your phone. Safari web apps were the way to go until six months later when Steve decided, or someone convinced Steve, that apps were the way to go—but of course. Duh! Apple came a long way in a short time from Safari web apps to “there’s an app for that.”

“Value” is different from “price.”

Woe unto you if you decide everything based on price. Even more woe unto you if you compete solely on price. Price is not all that matters—what is important, at least to some people, is value. And value takes into account training, support, and the intrinsic joy of using the best tool that’s made. It’s pretty safe to say that no one buys Apple products because of their low price.

A players hire A+ players.

Actually, Steve believed that A players hire A players—that is people who are as good as they are. I refined this slightly—my theory is that A players hire people even better than themselves. It’s clear, though, that B players hire C players so they can feel superior to them, and C players hire D players. If you start hiring B players, expect what Steve called “the bozo explosion” to happen in your organization.

Real CEOs demo.

Steve Jobs could demo a pod, pad, phone, and Mac two to three times a year with millions of people watching, why is it that many CEOs call upon their vice-president of engineering to do a product demo? Maybe it’s to show that there’s a team effort in play. Maybe. It’s more likely that the CEO doesn’t understand what his/her company is making well enough to explain it. How pathetic is that?

Real CEOs ship.

For all his perfectionism, Steve could ship. Maybe the product wasn’t perfect every time, but it was almost always great enough to go. The lesson is that Steve wasn’t tinkering for the sake of tinkering—he had a goal: shipping and achieving worldwide domination of existing markets or creation of new markets. Apple is an engineering-centric company, not a research-centric one. Which would you rather be: Apple or Xerox PARC?

Marketing boils down to providing unique value.

Think of a 2 x 2 matrix. The vertical axis measures how your product differs from the competition. The horizontal axis measures the value of your product. Bottom right: valuable but not unique—you’ll have to compete on price. Top left: unique but not valuable—you’ll own a market that doesn’t exist. Bottom left: not unique and not value—you’re a bozo. Top right: unique and valuable—this is where you make margin, money, and history. For example, the iPod was unique and valuable because it was the only way to legally, inexpensively, and easily download music from the six biggest record labels.

Bonus: Some things need to be believed to be seen. When you are jumping curves, defying/ignoring the experts, facing off against big challenges, obsessing about design, and focusing on unique value, you will need to convince people to believe in what you are doing in order to see your efforts come to fruition. People needed to believe in Macintosh to see it become real. Ditto for iPod, iPhone, and iPad. Not everyone will believe—that’s okay. But the starting point of changing the world is changing a few minds. This is the greatest lesson of all that I learned from Steve.___

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2011-08-27 18:22:40 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 0 +1s)

Pro Tip: This is how you really improve security for our customers. Note that there is no showing off on personal blogs or at "security" conferences either. :)

Pro Tip: This is how you really improve security for our customers. Note that there is no showing off on personal blogs or at "security" conferences either. :)___

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2011-08-13 16:27:17 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 0 +1s)

Dennis Rodman Emotional Hall of Fame Speech

Dennis Rodman Emotional Hall of Fame Speech___

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2011-08-12 06:34:24 (2 comments, 1 reshares, 2 +1s)

Great rant. Dylan Ratigan (rightfully) loses it on air

Great rant. Dylan Ratigan (rightfully) loses it on air___

2011-07-31 21:00:24 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 0 +1s)

There is blood in the water and this story is going national. Total PR disaster for airbnb.

Looks like the claim that #ransackgate had never happened b4 will bite AirBnB on the butt. That was clearly unlikely - http://tcrn.ch/oqw8vM___There is blood in the water and this story is going national. Total PR disaster for airbnb.

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2011-07-16 22:54:29 (1 comments, 3 reshares, 5 +1s)

Really cool mash-up that I had never heard until today.

Really cool mash-up that I had never heard until today.___

2011-07-16 18:43:30 (2 comments, 0 reshares, 0 +1s)

___

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2011-07-16 18:00:59 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 0 +1s)

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2011-07-16 07:18:34 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)

Happy Carmeggedon! Repent drivers, and ye shall be saved! 

Happy Carmeggedon! Repent drivers, and ye shall be saved! ___

2011-07-13 06:40:34 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 1 +1s)

Why I left Google. What happened to my book. What I work on at Facebook. http://t.co/O1I9V6Q

Why I left Google. What happened to my book. What I work on at Facebook. http://t.co/O1I9V6Q___

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2011-07-10 03:20:24 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 5 +1s)

Adorable, indeed.

Fun Photos for Google+ Part II___Adorable, indeed.

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2011-07-10 03:01:43 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 0 +1s)

A little somethin' from the old school on a Saturday night...

A little somethin' from the old school on a Saturday night...___

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2011-07-09 15:55:37 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 0 +1s)

Marc is a good force in our industry and probably a good human being in general, but he's a VC and his statements on the bubble are driven by self-interest.

Marc is a good force in our industry and probably a good human being in general, but he's a VC and his statements on the bubble are driven by self-interest.___

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