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Gideon Rosenblatt

Gideon Rosenblatt Von Google bestätigt 

Grounding Machines in Humanity

Beschäftigung: I write about the future of the human experience in an era of machine intelligence. (The Vital Edge)

Ort: Seattle

Follower: 50,884

Views: 183,469,341

Cream of the Crop: 04/01/2012

Auf CircleCount.com aufgenommen: 12/25/2011That's the date, where Gideon Rosenblatt has been indexed by CircleCount.com.
This hasn't to be the date where the daily check has been started.
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Gideon Rosenblatt has been at 3 events

HostFollowersTitleDateGuestsLinks
Yifat Cohen87,893*Why does the ex-head of American Express Chairman’s Innovation Fund think our future is in “producerism,” not consumerism?* What does it even mean?!? _This Hangout is public so feel free to share and invite your friends._ Using frameworks +Steve Faktor developed such as the 4C’s of Innovation™ - Creativity, Capabilities, Culture, and Context - and the Creativity Cube™, Mr. Faktor deconstructs the current economic environment to reveal innovation opportunities and growth sectors – health and education in particular. *Although his initial scenario suggests doom and gloom for the U.S. and other markets, the future he envisions is ripe with opportunity.* *SO - How do You Get Innovation Right?* Well, if we're lucky (and we usually are), Steve will dive into his latest book Econovation and share with us a future we've taken for granted. *It empowers readers to think big, dream big, and conquer economic conditions that will paralyze others.*  *WE WILL TOUCH ON HOW TO* Capitalize on a market that will go from making nothing to making everything . . . for China. Use psychological pricing and some crafty tricks from Google to reduce reliance on tapped-out consumers. Sell to consumers whose new identities will be based on what they create, not what they buy, click or super-size. Seduce a desperate government to finance your business, then feed you pancakes in the morning. Motivate tomorrow’s employees with social currency instead of the green, depreciating kind. Upgrade your business and your kids with a little help from Mormons and kindergartners with hacksaws. *WHO IS STEVEN?* Developing B2B startups at @109499489972846579596  and corporate speaking about emerging producerism opportunities that I wrote about in my book @116385844146363178305 and Forbes column.  --------------------- #hangoutsonair   #americanexpress   #econovation   #interview   #entrepreneur   #entrepreneurship   #economy   #goodbusiness   #amazon   #fortune500   #gplusgotogal  How Global Trends Will Shape the Future of Innovation.2013-01-17 18:00:0046  
Yifat Cohen87,893*Google+ changes the Truth about social media marketing.* _This is a public Hangout, feel free to share and invite_ Have you noticed the date? *Today the world is ending.* And it's a wonderful, wonderful thing. *Everything you know*, or think you know, about online marketing, social media, engagement and where's the money is online - *is no longer true*. *IN THIS HANGOUTS WE ARE GOING TO MAKE SOME TRULY CONTROVERSIAL CLAIMS* @116901017556394771817 is going to show you why you should pay attention to Google+ now, if you want to make money online.  He'll show you why the *money is no longer in the list* How the conversation have moved from one-to-many to *many-to-many* How you can *broadcast your Hangouts simultaneously on hundreds of sites* And most of all - *how to position yourself in front of this trend that is going to turn the social media world upside down.* *BUT WHO IS ALEX MANDOSSIAN TO BE CLAIMING THIS?* His colleagues and students acknowledge him as the Warren Buffet of the Internet because of his unique ability to teach his students how to make BIG money with very little risk.  Alex has generated $243 million in sales and profits for his small business students, clients and joint venture partners since 1993.   Many of the business strategies you'll learn today transformed his annual income in 2001 to be a monthly income in 2003; and eventually daily income by 2006. These marketing principles helped him grow his student data base from 200 people to 20,000 during his first 2 years in business ... and to over 200,000 during the following 3 years. He has engaged with best-selling authors such as Jack Canfield, @112439370122733503773  @105578574150809713602 and @113217646903708244617 (4-Hr Work Wk) Business leaders such as Donald Trump, Vic Conant of Nightingale Conant and Ivan Misner, CEO of Business Network International, and celebs such as Larry King and Mohammad Ali to name a few. *As a family-centered entrepreneur who works from home*, his goal is to become the world’s 1st "work-at-home" billionaire, not just in Net Worth, but by creating 1,000 other Internet millionaires …The money is no longer in the list, so where is it?2012-12-20 18:00:0058  
Yifat Cohen87,893*How the social revolution is changing the way we do business.* We all keep hearing about how important it is to engage and build relationships - what does it really mean, and what tools are out there to help us master it? When @105103058358743760661 spoke at DreamForce he saw *a vision for a future of business information systems that is entirely based on relationships.* *ENGAGE OR DIE.* In this Hangout On Air, we'll dive into the topic of engagement with @105103058358743760661   as he explains what he calls "engagement leverage." This framework bridges the kind of internal engagement you need with employees with the external engagement you need with customers, suppliers, partners and other external stakeholders. It's a simple, yet surprisingly powerful way for thinking about the way your organization gets work done.  Gideon writes at Alchemy of Change about helping companies bring purpose and technology together into a more powerful source of competitive advantage. Gideon just came back from leading a panel on engagement at Salesforce's Dreamforce Conference (now the biggest tech conference in the world) and so in addition to talking with us about the engagement leverage model, he'll also share some of what he saw at Dreamforce. (http://www.salesforce.com/dreamforce/DF12/)DreamForce: what I learned about the relationship revolution.2012-10-04 18:00:0063  

Shared Circles, die Gideon Rosenblatt enthalten.

Shared Circles gibt es nicht mehr auf Google+, aber Du kannst Dir die Historie hier anschauen.

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Die Top Beiträge aus den letzten 50 Beiträgen

Die meisten Kommentare: 43

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2016-12-26 18:02:05 (43 comments; 14 reshares; 86 +1s; )Open 

Die meisten Reshares: 41

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2016-12-31 06:53:47 (10 comments; 41 reshares; 132 +1s; )Open 

The Story of Google's Revolution in Machine Translation

This is a piece of history that just unfolded this year, and this NYT piece captures it beautifully. It's the bigger story of artificial intelligence. It's that story, zoomed in on a big bet to run Google Translate on machine learning.

There are so many interesting parts to this piece. I'll highlight this one about the training process though:

“We did hundreds of experiments,” Schuster told me, “until we knew that we could stop the training after one week. You’re always saying: When do we stop? How do I know I’m done? You never know you’re done. The machine-learning mechanism is never perfect. You need to train, and at some point you have to stop. That’s the very painful nature of this whole system. It’s hard for some people. It’s a little bit an art — where you put yourbrush to make it ni... mehr »

Die meisten +1: 473

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2017-01-01 18:13:13 (31 comments; 9 reshares; 473 +1s; )Open 

Happy 2017!

Here is wishing all of my friends, teachers, and fellow sojourners here on Google+ a happy, healthy and meaningful 2017. In the year ahead, may we all be just a little more understanding, courageous and full of hope.

Happy New Year! 

Die Letzten 50 Beiträge

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2017-01-22 18:23:26 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 0 +1s; )Open 

I found this really moving to watch. For more background on MILCK and her geurrila performances yesterday at the marches:
http://www.curvemag.com/Culture/Womens-March-In-Washington-1719/

The marches went so smoothly, had such huge turnout and no arrests (as far as I've heard), and got such resoundingly positive media coverage that I'm starting to think that we men need to step back and let the women lead - especially now. Don't get me wrong, we need to join in - just as many, many men (including myself) did yesterday. But yesterday's performance really does suggest for me that for today's challenges, the women might be the better leaders.

I found this really moving to watch. For more background on MILCK and her geurrila performances yesterday at the marches:
http://www.curvemag.com/Culture/Womens-March-In-Washington-1719/

The marches went so smoothly, had such huge turnout and no arrests (as far as I've heard), and got such resoundingly positive media coverage that I'm starting to think that we men need to step back and let the women lead - especially now. Don't get me wrong, we need to join in - just as many, many men (including myself) did yesterday. But yesterday's performance really does suggest for me that for today's challenges, the women might be the better leaders.___

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2017-01-21 23:12:10 (14 comments; 0 reshares; 39 +1s; )Open 

Seattle, you made me proud today. Ah, this march of wonderful people demonstrating that every cloud has its silver lining.

Easily the largest gathering of marchers in Seattle history. Latest estimates of today's march are 120,000 people - a line of packed people, over three miles long.

http://komonews.com/news/local/thousands-expected-at-womens-marches-across-the-northwest

Seattle, you made me proud today. Ah, this march of wonderful people demonstrating that every cloud has its silver lining.

Easily the largest gathering of marchers in Seattle history. Latest estimates of today's march are 120,000 people - a line of packed people, over three miles long.

http://komonews.com/news/local/thousands-expected-at-womens-marches-across-the-northwest___

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2017-01-18 00:10:22 (4 comments; 8 reshares; 42 +1s; )Open 

Compensating User-Contributed Data in Machine Learning

We've learned that complex machine learning requires lots of processing power (jet engine) and lots of data (jet fuel). So it's no surprise that the big winners are those companies like Facebook, Google, Uber and others that sit atop massive systems for gathering user feedback.

In this piece, +Alvis Brigis asks whether there is an economic model for compensating end users who contribute to that learning. A couple years back, I spent some time trying to model what that might look like using data from Tsu (remember them??). Color me a bit skeptical. What I learned was that without some mechanisms for concentrating that income (which is what Tsu did through its affiliate system), it's really hard to generate meaningful income for an individual user.

All that said, perhaps if there is enough income... mehr »

As AI replaces traditional jobs, it will create new jobs in the form of AI trainers, posits Alvis Brigis. "As the companies now trailblazing AI (Google, Amazon, Apple, Microsoft, Facebook, Tesla, Uber, etc) have generated more value through machine learning, they've realized that 1) machine learning can be applied to infinitely more domains/problems, 2) that more complex, creative problems require more human-in-the-loop intervention, and 3) that more value can be created by integrating the machine learning they've already done -- a cumulative effect, eg Google's recent breakthrough in translation, which ultimately required billions or trillions of human-in-the-loop (including you, if you ever used Google Translate) machine learning cycles to finally break through to another level of automatic functionality."

"As the Great AI Race heats up and more companies, countries and other actors come to realize the narrow and broader potential of human-in-the-loop machine learning, the demand for machine learning pros, machine learning guides and content workers will grow proportionately, driving up their share of the pie as they help to build more intelligent superstructures brick by brick."

"The amount of value shared with users will depend on the size of the pie. With Kurzweil's Law of Accelerating Returns in full effect, that pie is likely to grow MASSIVELY."

Ok, now that I have summarized the argument (hopefully fairly, but you can go read the whole post and judge for yourself), I'd like to tack on my own commentary. As a counterargument to this, I would posit that:

1) People paid to train AIs already exist; they are the people who work labeling training data on Amazon Mechanical Turk. Rather than repeat that post, I'll just link to it:

https://plus.google.com/+WayneRadinsky/posts/U6vktFsPYFC

But I will summarize the key point, which is that AI training jobs are crappy jobs. The pay is low, the work is dull, and, if you want to make enough money to actually live on, you have to sacrifice a sane sleeping schedule because you have to jump on the jobs fast enough otherwise other people will eat them all up before you have a chance to work on them.

2) It seems unlikely the number of these jobs is going to equal the number of jobs displaced. I realize in saying this that AI automates tasks, which are slices of "jobs", not whole jobs, so this is not a one-to-one correspondence. Even if it does, that situation is temporary, because

3) The endgame is for AI to be able to do everything the human brain can do, and if that's the case, then AI will be able to do all the crappy training jobs as well. (More precisely, the need for such jobs will and must cease to exist at some point.) I realize this is not imminent and probably won't happen in any of our lifetimes, so during our lifetimes we will experience a "transition period," and during that period, the number of AI training jobs will grow until it reaches some maximum at which point it will decline. So the question is whether the maximum is sufficient to generate enough paid jobs for billions of people.

4) To me, this argument seems to stem from the thinking that people who think technology destroys jobs are "Luddites" and are falling for the "Luddite fallacy", while in reality, while jobs are destroyed, other jobs are always created in some other part of the economy. (See also: lump of labor fallacy). There is evidence this time it's different. First, for as long as the data has been tracked, the proportions of GDP going to capital and labor have stayed within a narrow band, but starting in about 2005, it went out of that band, indicating that this time, it's different. This graph shows the labor share going out of its previous band around 2005:

https://fred.stlouisfed.org/series/PRS85006173

Returns to capital is the inverse of this graph, just flip it upside down. Here's a related graph of corporate profits, showing corporate profits are higher than they've been since the World War II period, and there have even been recent years that exceeded the World War II period:

https://fred.stlouisfed.org/graph/?g=cSh

(As an aside, anyone who thinks that cutting taxes on corporations will generate jobs is wrong -- corporations already have extremely high profits, and making them higher won't result in more hiring. Apple, to cite one example, is sitting on $237.6 billion in cash. Increasing that to $250 billion or $300 billion won't result in hiring -- if Apple wanted to hire people, they could hire thousands of people with the cash they have right now. But they aren't, and they won't.)

Finally, there's this famous graph showing the divergence of the productivity of the economy vs labor income.

https://thecurrentmoment.files.wordpress.com/2011/08/productivity-and-real-wages.jpg

As you can see, starting in the 80s -- actually the first hint was in the late 70s (!) -- productivity and income start to diverge. Labor gets less and less of the fruits of the productivity of the economy.

Applying this to our Mechanical Turk scenario, this suggests that the economic value created by Mechanical Turk workers will go to Google and Facebook shareholders, etc, and not to Mechanical Turk workers.___Compensating User-Contributed Data in Machine Learning

We've learned that complex machine learning requires lots of processing power (jet engine) and lots of data (jet fuel). So it's no surprise that the big winners are those companies like Facebook, Google, Uber and others that sit atop massive systems for gathering user feedback.

In this piece, +Alvis Brigis asks whether there is an economic model for compensating end users who contribute to that learning. A couple years back, I spent some time trying to model what that might look like using data from Tsu (remember them??). Color me a bit skeptical. What I learned was that without some mechanisms for concentrating that income (which is what Tsu did through its affiliate system), it's really hard to generate meaningful income for an individual user.

All that said, perhaps if there is enough income coming in from all the different companies benefiting from our work to train these systems, it will serve as at least a meaningful part of the new income-generating solutions (including Basic Income) for generating non-wage income.

HT +Wayne Radinsky.

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2017-01-17 15:10:51 (4 comments; 13 reshares; 43 +1s; )Open 

The Great Adventure of Knowing Ourselves

This is a wonderful talk by +Rupert Spira​ on the nature of Consciousness. For many of us, it may cause some creaking and groaning within the mind in order to perceive this understanding of reality.

I believe it's worth the effort.

If you listen very carefully, you will hear me clapping there in the audience at the Science and Non-duality Conference a few months ago. :)

#consciousness

The Great Adventure of Knowing Ourselves

This is a wonderful talk by +Rupert Spira​ on the nature of Consciousness. For many of us, it may cause some creaking and groaning within the mind in order to perceive this understanding of reality.

I believe it's worth the effort.

If you listen very carefully, you will hear me clapping there in the audience at the Science and Non-duality Conference a few months ago. :)

#consciousness___

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2017-01-16 03:08:58 (6 comments; 0 reshares; 23 +1s; )Open 

Think of the seven days here more in the Biblical sense - i.e. as a day not necessarily translating into a strict, 24-hour period. I say this not because the technological change of a singularity would be slower, but because the human response to it would not move on the order of days pictured here.

Still, it's an interesting seven minute vision of AI awakening and the potential impact on humans.

HT +Wayne Radinsky

7 Days of AI. (From last year but I somehow didn't see until today.) This video in the style of a sci-fi film intro (using sci-fi film clips) shows how in 7 days, DeepMind will lead to fully automated luxury communism (and more).___Think of the seven days here more in the Biblical sense - i.e. as a day not necessarily translating into a strict, 24-hour period. I say this not because the technological change of a singularity would be slower, but because the human response to it would not move on the order of days pictured here.

Still, it's an interesting seven minute vision of AI awakening and the potential impact on humans.

HT +Wayne Radinsky

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2017-01-16 00:59:03 (16 comments; 0 reshares; 30 +1s; )Open 

When you belong in the funny papers...

When you belong in the funny papers...___

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2017-01-14 02:13:25 (8 comments; 27 reshares; 171 +1s; )Open 

Knowledge is being replaced by knowing

A great article by +David Weinberger, disguised as a book review.
Here's the link: https://goo.gl/elwSEd

Here's the best quote in this piece:
The net is demonstrating the weakness of knowledge as finished, settled, and static content. It’s doing so by plunging us deeper into knowing.

But there's a lot of other gems to be found here:

The net is making clear how important “echo chambers” are to knowledge and even more so to understanding. If you care about molecular gastronomy and hear about a new technique, you’ll go to your favorite molecular gastronomy sites to learn more. If you’re a supporter of Net Neutrality and there’s a court ruling you don’t understand, you’ll go to a site that shares your values to get the explanation. If you are a feminist and a new pay equity lawpasses, you’re ... mehr »

Knowledge is being replaced by knowing

A great article by +David Weinberger, disguised as a book review.
Here's the link: https://goo.gl/elwSEd

Here's the best quote in this piece:
The net is demonstrating the weakness of knowledge as finished, settled, and static content. It’s doing so by plunging us deeper into knowing.

But there's a lot of other gems to be found here:

The net is making clear how important “echo chambers” are to knowledge and even more so to understanding. If you care about molecular gastronomy and hear about a new technique, you’ll go to your favorite molecular gastronomy sites to learn more. If you’re a supporter of Net Neutrality and there’s a court ruling you don’t understand, you’ll go to a site that shares your values to get the explanation. If you are a feminist and a new pay equity law passes, you’re not going to go to a male supremacy site to find out what it means for you. Knowledge and culture depend on like-minded individuals joining together and iterating over tiny differences. This is how the net works. This is also how traditional knowing works. We did not like to acknowledge that. Now we can’t avoid it.
...
Perhaps our chief epistemic avoidance mechanism was turning knowing into the production of a type of content — knowledge — that we convinced ourselves had to be independent of the knower in two senses.
First, we devised methodologies that try to keep the vagaries of the individual out of the process of creating knowledge. The scientific method works. Journalistic objectivity continues to be reevaluated...

Second, we physically separated knowledge from individuals by externalizing it (e.g., books). What started in Greece as a particular class of belief became a body of printed statements that could be called knowledge even if there was no one left to believe them. Obviously, this has been wildly successful for our species, but it also meant that the medium of externalization — paper — has shaped knowledge to fit its peculiarities.
...
There’s tremendous value in consulting existing bodies of well-vetted beliefs, and, to their credit, teachers like Professor Lynch expose us to that value. But there is also value in the networking of knowledge in which ideas are linked in their differences. We can go wrong in those networks, but we can also go very right, achieving a new sense of how knowledge goes together even if it never fully coheres.

Much, much more too. It's worth the read.

Related: a talk I gave in Singapore last year that touches on these topics and our "containers of collective intelligence":
http://www.the-vital-edge.com/machine-based-collective-intellige/

#knowledge ___

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2017-01-13 21:40:18 (21 comments; 10 reshares; 82 +1s; )Open 

Consciousness as Integrated Information

Not for everyone, but if you're into thinking about consciousness and wonder whether it might not just be a universal phenomenon, this paper is for you. ;)

For those uncomfortable with subscribing to a panpsychist theory, a possible way round the problem is to assign an attribute “potential consciousness” to matter at the most fundamental level. Then, the quantity of potential consciousness is simply the quantity of integrated intrinsic information. But only when there is a large amount of intrinsic integrated information with a sufficiently rich structure to be worthy of being compared to a typical healthy adult human waking conscious moment, should we say that the integrated information has “actual consciousness” associated with it. A line could thus be drawn somewhere between the potential consciousness of an isolatedelectro... mehr »

Consciousness as Integrated Information

Not for everyone, but if you're into thinking about consciousness and wonder whether it might not just be a universal phenomenon, this paper is for you. ;)

For those uncomfortable with subscribing to a panpsychist theory, a possible way round the problem is to assign an attribute “potential consciousness” to matter at the most fundamental level. Then, the quantity of potential consciousness is simply the quantity of integrated intrinsic information. But only when there is a large amount of intrinsic integrated information with a sufficiently rich structure to be worthy of being compared to a typical healthy adult human waking conscious moment, should we say that the integrated information has “actual consciousness” associated with it. A line could thus be drawn somewhere between the potential consciousness of an isolated electron in a vacuum and the actual consciousness generated by my brain as I write this article. The problem with such a distinction however is that potential consciousness would still be assigned phenomenal content, so it is perhaps more elegant to just use a single term “consciousness” for the whole spectrum of integrated information.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3912322/

Thanks to +Darius Gabriel Black for introducing me to IIT.

#consciousness #panpsychism ___

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2017-01-13 18:50:55 (1 comments; 4 reshares; 27 +1s; )Open 


Asgardians Unite!

We are getting closer to understanding the biological origins of multicellular organisms. How cool is that?

Very.

Eukaryotic cells are generally much bigger than either bacteria or archaea. They also have larger genomes. They have internal compartments that act like our organs, each with its own special job. They have an internal skeleton that acts as a transport network for molecules. There’s this huge gulf of complexity that separates them from the other two domains. It’s a gulf that has only ever been crossed once in life’s history. Bacteria and archaea are capable of amazing feats of evolution, but in over 3.7 billion years of existence, none of them have ever evolved into anything approaching a eukaryote-like cell—except that one time.

Thanks +John Hagel

Have we discovered the microbes that we've evolved from? We're getting closer as the evidence mounts . . . ___
Asgardians Unite!

We are getting closer to understanding the biological origins of multicellular organisms. How cool is that?

Very.

Eukaryotic cells are generally much bigger than either bacteria or archaea. They also have larger genomes. They have internal compartments that act like our organs, each with its own special job. They have an internal skeleton that acts as a transport network for molecules. There’s this huge gulf of complexity that separates them from the other two domains. It’s a gulf that has only ever been crossed once in life’s history. Bacteria and archaea are capable of amazing feats of evolution, but in over 3.7 billion years of existence, none of them have ever evolved into anything approaching a eukaryote-like cell—except that one time.

Thanks +John Hagel

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2017-01-13 17:55:16 (37 comments; 3 reshares; 38 +1s; )Open 

+Medium is having problems with its business model, so they are re-focusing. On this:

We believe people who write and share ideas should be rewarded on their ability to enlighten and inform, not simply their ability to attract a few seconds of attention. We believe there are millions of thinking people who want to deepen their understanding of the world and are dissatisfied with what they get from traditional news and their social feeds. We believe that a better system — one that serves people — is possible. In fact, it’s imperative.

So, we are shifting our resources and attention to defining a new model for writers and creators to be rewarded, based on the value they’re creating for people. And toward building a transformational product for curious humans who want to get smarter about the world every day.

I really wish them success; especially in a world of#fakefakenews <... mehr »

+Medium is having problems with its business model, so they are re-focusing. On this:

We believe people who write and share ideas should be rewarded on their ability to enlighten and inform, not simply their ability to attract a few seconds of attention. We believe there are millions of thinking people who want to deepen their understanding of the world and are dissatisfied with what they get from traditional news and their social feeds. We believe that a better system — one that serves people — is possible. In fact, it’s imperative.

So, we are shifting our resources and attention to defining a new model for writers and creators to be rewarded, based on the value they’re creating for people. And toward building a transformational product for curious humans who want to get smarter about the world every day.

I really wish them success; especially in a world of #fakefakenews

Details here: https://blog.medium.com/renewing-mediums-focus-98f374a960be#.2wwyh815k___

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2017-01-13 15:20:35 (1 comments; 1 reshares; 17 +1s; )Open 

Fixing Web Publishing

Yeah, it's pretty broken right now. We have an ecosystem that isn't that healthy, where most of the profits from online publishing are increasingly concentrated into the hands of the platform owners. Is there a way to resuscitate the golden days of web publishing? Given what we have today, how do we fix this mess? +John Battelle asks some important questions.

HT +Teodora Petkova over on +Medium

#publishing

Fixing Web Publishing

Yeah, it's pretty broken right now. We have an ecosystem that isn't that healthy, where most of the profits from online publishing are increasingly concentrated into the hands of the platform owners. Is there a way to resuscitate the golden days of web publishing? Given what we have today, how do we fix this mess? +John Battelle asks some important questions.

HT +Teodora Petkova over on +Medium

#publishing___

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2017-01-08 20:03:43 (6 comments; 3 reshares; 35 +1s; )Open 

A beautiful jewel floating in the dark, with its reflection.



A beautiful jewel floating in the dark, with its reflection.

___

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2017-01-08 15:39:44 (23 comments; 9 reshares; 30 +1s; )Open 

The sad, sad story of how the CEO of Sears is killing this American institution. 

The sad, sad story of how the CEO of Sears is killing this American institution. ___

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2017-01-07 20:57:56 (22 comments; 3 reshares; 35 +1s; )Open 



This piece is after my own heart. Great to see Thomas Friedman talking about this stuff.

In short: If machines can compete with people in thinking, what makes us humans unique? And what will enable us to continue to create social and economic value? The answer, said Seidman, is the one thing machines will never have: “a heart.”





This piece is after my own heart. Great to see Thomas Friedman talking about this stuff.

In short: If machines can compete with people in thinking, what makes us humans unique? And what will enable us to continue to create social and economic value? The answer, said Seidman, is the one thing machines will never have: “a heart.”

___

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2017-01-07 18:21:12 (40 comments; 2 reshares; 31 +1s; )Open 


I'm starting to now track the idea of a basic income with its own dedicated collection: the Universal Basic Income Collection. :)

To kick it off, here's a good one:

Don't like Basic Income because pay should be tied to work? This article might change your mind.

In 2015, according to PSZ, the richest 1% of people in America received 20.2% of all the income in the nation. Ten points of that 20.2% came from equity income, net interest, housing rents, and the capital component of mixed income. Which is to say, 10% of all national income is paid out to the 1% as capital income. Let me reiterate: 1 in 10 dollars of income produced in this country is paid out to the richest 1% without them having to work for it.

Oh, and if you want to know how we generate this massive passive income for the 1%, read this:... mehr »


I'm starting to now track the idea of a basic income with its own dedicated collection: the Universal Basic Income Collection. :)

To kick it off, here's a good one:

Don't like Basic Income because pay should be tied to work? This article might change your mind.

In 2015, according to PSZ, the richest 1% of people in America received 20.2% of all the income in the nation. Ten points of that 20.2% came from equity income, net interest, housing rents, and the capital component of mixed income. Which is to say, 10% of all national income is paid out to the 1% as capital income. Let me reiterate: 1 in 10 dollars of income produced in this country is paid out to the richest 1% without them having to work for it.

Oh, and if you want to know how we generate this massive passive income for the 1%, read this:
http://www.the-vital-edge.com/stock-market-concentration-of-wealth/

#basicincome #UBI
___

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2017-01-07 03:01:54 (26 comments; 12 reshares; 51 +1s; )Open 

Yeah, uh, we're talking about sudden, rising sea levels - about 4 inches.

Boom.

Ugh.



Yeah, uh, we're talking about sudden, rising sea levels - about 4 inches.

Boom.

Ugh.

___

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2017-01-06 19:30:41 (6 comments; 8 reshares; 85 +1s; )Open 

"StarCraft is an interesting testing environment for current AI research because it provides a useful bridge to the messiness of the real-world. The skills required for an agent to progress through the environment and play StarCraft well could ultimately transfer to real-world tasks."

"StarCraft is an interesting testing environment for current AI research because it provides a useful bridge to the messiness of the real-world. The skills required for an agent to progress through the environment and play StarCraft well could ultimately transfer to real-world tasks."___

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2017-01-06 14:46:35 (10 comments; 11 reshares; 107 +1s; )Open 

In knowing, we learn to see our prison.

___In knowing, we learn to see our prison.

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2017-01-05 23:18:37 (22 comments; 22 reshares; 75 +1s; )Open 

Making Universal Basic Income Real

For the past couple years, I've been loosely tracking the idea of Universal Basic Income (UBI). My interest grew from a growing concern about people's ability to keep up with the blistering pace with which automation and machine learning are tackling what had previously been human work.

Over the holidays, I read Peter Barnes' book, With Liberty and Dividends for All (https://goo.gl/OdU9YN). It's a quick read and it makes a compelling case for UBI.

Then, today, I watched Kartik Gada outline his thinking on how to make UBI a reality, while simultaneously solving some other gnarly economic and societal problems. Here is a quick summary of his main points:

* We are entering a phase in our economic growth where deflation poses a more serious threat than inflation. The cause of this deflation is the growing... mehr »

Making Universal Basic Income Real

For the past couple years, I've been loosely tracking the idea of Universal Basic Income (UBI). My interest grew from a growing concern about people's ability to keep up with the blistering pace with which automation and machine learning are tackling what had previously been human work.

Over the holidays, I read Peter Barnes' book, With Liberty and Dividends for All (https://goo.gl/OdU9YN). It's a quick read and it makes a compelling case for UBI.

Then, today, I watched Kartik Gada outline his thinking on how to make UBI a reality, while simultaneously solving some other gnarly economic and societal problems. Here is a quick summary of his main points:

* We are entering a phase in our economic growth where deflation poses a more serious threat than inflation. The cause of this deflation is the growing percentage of total economic output that is subject to technological deflation.

* To deal with deflationary pressure, central banks are creating more money through a process of quantitative easing. We are now in the third wave of this easing, and it's not enough. Deflationary pressures will accelerate as a growing portion of the economy becomes subject to technological deflation.

* The banks rely on treasuries and mortgage-backed securities to do their quantitative easing, but those channels for money creation are losing their effectiveness. We need a broader set of channels.

* One way of broadening the channels through which new money is infused into the economy is to simply distribute it directly to citizens in the form of a UBI.

* In Kartik's proposal, the UBI would be universal rather than means-tested. I've come around to this view thanks to arguments by Peter Barnes. It would also gradually replace other forms of government assistance and insurance, and in so doing, eliminate income taxes and streamline/eliminate government agencies tasked with taxes and redistribution.

* Here's the key insight: as technology accelerates, so does its deflationary pressure, and the need for ever increasing amounts of quantitative easing. As a result, UBI payments would naturally grow as the economy becomes increasingly technological in nature.

So, why am I illustrating this post with a picture of the "Go" space from a Monopoly board? This is an analogy from Peter Barnes. The UBI acts as a kind of $200 cash infusion into the board. Without that infusion, the game can't move: there's not enough money to buy properties, houses, hotels, etc. Think of the UBI as a new way of injecting liquidity into the economy: one that doesn't rely on our banking system's ability to create money by issuing debt.

This is a really interesting proposal. You can find Kartik's Google Talk here:
https://goo.gl/Kqw87v

And here is his website with a more detailed summary (which I haven't yet read):
https://goo.gl/AWiyn3

A heartfelt thanks to +Mark Bruce, without whom I would not have come across this work. If you're not following Mark already, I highly recommend him. Lots of interesting stuff in his stream here on G+.

#UBI #BasicIncome ___

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2017-01-05 04:02:09 (3 comments; 1 reshares; 27 +1s; )Open 

“The universe is a communion of subjects rather than a collection of objects.”
~ Thomas Berry

“The universe is a communion of subjects rather than a collection of objects.”
~ Thomas Berry___

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2017-01-04 23:29:50 (4 comments; 6 reshares; 40 +1s; )Open 

The Brain's Mechanisms for Focus

Here's +David Amerland outlining some of the processes that the human brain uses to filter out noise as well as tune in to important signals:

The figure-ground effect is a mental interpretational mechanism that takes in data and ascribes meaning to it in relation to the background it is in or the data that surrounds it.


HT +Teodora Petkova over on Twitter (https://twitter.com/TheodoraPetkova)...

The Brain's Mechanisms for Focus

Here's +David Amerland outlining some of the processes that the human brain uses to filter out noise as well as tune in to important signals:

The figure-ground effect is a mental interpretational mechanism that takes in data and ascribes meaning to it in relation to the background it is in or the data that surrounds it.


HT +Teodora Petkova over on Twitter (https://twitter.com/TheodoraPetkova)...___

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2017-01-04 01:18:14 (5 comments; 13 reshares; 60 +1s; )Open 

Artificial Intelligence to Secure Biodiversity

Some really interesting applications of machine learning to assist in protecting sea birds, frogs, elephants, fish and Egyptian fruit bats. The most interesting one is the use of machine learning to decipher communications between individual fruit bats. Dr. Doolittle, you were ahead of your time.

#biodiversity #machinelearning


Artificial Intelligence to Secure Biodiversity

Some really interesting applications of machine learning to assist in protecting sea birds, frogs, elephants, fish and Egyptian fruit bats. The most interesting one is the use of machine learning to decipher communications between individual fruit bats. Dr. Doolittle, you were ahead of your time.

#biodiversity #machinelearning
___

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2017-01-03 18:00:25 (29 comments; 25 reshares; 63 +1s; )Open 

Facebook is now learning to decipher when its users enter into romantic relationships. The data is aggregate and anonymized but:

a) the temptation to use this capability to tweak advertising messages will likely be too great to resist
b) it's another example of large corporations peering into the most private, most intimate, aspects of our lives



Facebook is now learning to decipher when its users enter into romantic relationships. The data is aggregate and anonymized but:

a) the temptation to use this capability to tweak advertising messages will likely be too great to resist
b) it's another example of large corporations peering into the most private, most intimate, aspects of our lives

___

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2017-01-03 15:11:31 (1 comments; 7 reshares; 25 +1s; )Open 

+Scott Santens​ lays out his favorite articles about Basic Income from last year. 

+Scott Santens​ lays out his favorite articles about Basic Income from last year. ___

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2017-01-02 16:47:28 (2 comments; 8 reshares; 26 +1s; )Open 

This piece starts with an overview of "Industry 4.0" and his people will be at the center of it. Then, it goes in an important different direction, looking at how the personalization of production will change production processes in a way that dramatically reduces waste and the problems of over-consumption.

HT +P2P Foundation​

This piece starts with an overview of "Industry 4.0" and his people will be at the center of it. Then, it goes in an important different direction, looking at how the personalization of production will change production processes in a way that dramatically reduces waste and the problems of over-consumption.

HT +P2P Foundation​___

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2017-01-01 18:13:13 (31 comments; 9 reshares; 473 +1s; )Open 

Happy 2017!

Here is wishing all of my friends, teachers, and fellow sojourners here on Google+ a happy, healthy and meaningful 2017. In the year ahead, may we all be just a little more understanding, courageous and full of hope.

Happy New Year! 

Happy 2017!

Here is wishing all of my friends, teachers, and fellow sojourners here on Google+ a happy, healthy and meaningful 2017. In the year ahead, may we all be just a little more understanding, courageous and full of hope.

Happy New Year! ___

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2017-01-01 17:36:07 (25 comments; 4 reshares; 36 +1s; )Open 

France passes "right to disconnect" law to stop work from encroaching into personal lives. I think the chances of something like this passing in the U.S. are low through political means at this point. But I wonder whether companies voluntarily embracing a policy like this might be more attractive from a recruiting perspective -- especially to a Millennial workforce.

I love the closing contrast at the end of this piece, with the Today Show folks noting it wouldn't pass here as they promote annual "red nose" day. Hey, we may work you hard here, but at least least you get to have fun in the process. ;)


France passes "right to disconnect" law to stop work from encroaching into personal lives. I think the chances of something like this passing in the U.S. are low through political means at this point. But I wonder whether companies voluntarily embracing a policy like this might be more attractive from a recruiting perspective -- especially to a Millennial workforce.

I love the closing contrast at the end of this piece, with the Today Show folks noting it wouldn't pass here as they promote annual "red nose" day. Hey, we may work you hard here, but at least least you get to have fun in the process. ;)
___

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2016-12-31 06:53:47 (10 comments; 41 reshares; 132 +1s; )Open 

The Story of Google's Revolution in Machine Translation

This is a piece of history that just unfolded this year, and this NYT piece captures it beautifully. It's the bigger story of artificial intelligence. It's that story, zoomed in on a big bet to run Google Translate on machine learning.

There are so many interesting parts to this piece. I'll highlight this one about the training process though:

“We did hundreds of experiments,” Schuster told me, “until we knew that we could stop the training after one week. You’re always saying: When do we stop? How do I know I’m done? You never know you’re done. The machine-learning mechanism is never perfect. You need to train, and at some point you have to stop. That’s the very painful nature of this whole system. It’s hard for some people. It’s a little bit an art — where you put yourbrush to make it ni... mehr »

The Story of Google's Revolution in Machine Translation

This is a piece of history that just unfolded this year, and this NYT piece captures it beautifully. It's the bigger story of artificial intelligence. It's that story, zoomed in on a big bet to run Google Translate on machine learning.

There are so many interesting parts to this piece. I'll highlight this one about the training process though:

“We did hundreds of experiments,” Schuster told me, “until we knew that we could stop the training after one week. You’re always saying: When do we stop? How do I know I’m done? You never know you’re done. The machine-learning mechanism is never perfect. You need to train, and at some point you have to stop. That’s the very painful nature of this whole system. It’s hard for some people. It’s a little bit an art — where you put your brush to make it nice. It comes from just doing it. Some people are better, some worse.”

And this, on some of the employment implications to machine learning inching into Natural Language Processing:

Once you’ve built a robust pattern-matching apparatus for one purpose, it can be tweaked in the service of others. One Translate engineer took a network he put together to judge artwork and used it to drive an autonomous radio-controlled car. A network built to recognize a cat can be turned around and trained on CT scans — and on infinitely more examples than even the best doctor could ever review. A neural network built to translate could work through millions of pages of documents of legal discovery in the tiniest fraction of the time it would take the most expensively credentialed lawyer. The kinds of jobs taken by automatons will no longer be just repetitive tasks that were once — unfairly, it ought to be emphasized — associated with the supposed lower intelligence of the uneducated classes. We’re not only talking about three and a half million truck drivers who may soon lack careers. We’re talking about inventory managers, economists, financial advisers, real estate agents. What Brain did over nine months is just one example of how quickly a small group at a large company can automate a task nobody ever would have associated with machines.

Thanks to +Alex Herrero for bringing this to my attention.

___

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2016-12-31 04:56:45 (12 comments; 9 reshares; 46 +1s; )Open 

Three Segments of AI Companies

I thought this was a useful way to segment the emerging machine learning market, based largely on access to data:

There are three different types of Machine Learning and Artificial Intelligence companies: The Superrich, the Servicers, and the Innovators.

* Superrich: Companies that do machine learning AND have their own data.
* Servicers: Companies that do machine learning on other people’s data.
* Innovators: Companies that do machine learning and have to get access to data.

HT to +Wayne Radinsky from over on Twitter.


Three Segments of AI Companies

I thought this was a useful way to segment the emerging machine learning market, based largely on access to data:

There are three different types of Machine Learning and Artificial Intelligence companies: The Superrich, the Servicers, and the Innovators.

* Superrich: Companies that do machine learning AND have their own data.
* Servicers: Companies that do machine learning on other people’s data.
* Innovators: Companies that do machine learning and have to get access to data.

HT to +Wayne Radinsky from over on Twitter.
___

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2016-12-30 06:10:27 (6 comments; 11 reshares; 76 +1s; )Open 

Good overview of some of the ways Facebook is applying machine learning. 

Good overview of some of the ways Facebook is applying machine learning. ___

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2016-12-28 18:37:24 (10 comments; 0 reshares; 27 +1s; )Open 

Volcanos and waterfalls from our recent trip to the Big Island of Hawaii! What a magical place.

All these were shot and edited by my son, +Jaidha Rosenblatt. 

Volcanos and waterfalls from our recent trip to the Big Island of Hawaii! What a magical place.

All these were shot and edited by my son, +Jaidha Rosenblatt. ___

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2016-12-27 01:20:52 (11 comments; 1 reshares; 29 +1s; )Open 

A detailed look at religious beliefs in the United States.

I found this interesting:
While the share of Americans who believe in God has ticked downward (92% to 89%), among those who do believe in God, there has been very little change in views about God’s nature. Currently, roughly two-thirds of adults who believe in God (64%) say they see God as a person with whom they can have a relationship, and 29% say they view God as an impersonal force.

Also:
The study finds that regularly feeling a strong sense of gratitude is most common among those who are highly religiously observant. Fully 90% of those who say they attend religious services at least once a week also say they feel a deep sense of gratitude at least once a week, as do 88% of those who say religion is “very important” in their lives. But gratitude also is experienced regularly by many people whoare n... mehr »

A detailed look at religious beliefs in the United States.

I found this interesting:
While the share of Americans who believe in God has ticked downward (92% to 89%), among those who do believe in God, there has been very little change in views about God’s nature. Currently, roughly two-thirds of adults who believe in God (64%) say they see God as a person with whom they can have a relationship, and 29% say they view God as an impersonal force.

Also:
The study finds that regularly feeling a strong sense of gratitude is most common among those who are highly religiously observant. Fully 90% of those who say they attend religious services at least once a week also say they feel a deep sense of gratitude at least once a week, as do 88% of those who say religion is “very important” in their lives. But gratitude also is experienced regularly by many people who are not very religiously observant.
___

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2016-12-26 22:07:53 (7 comments; 23 reshares; 109 +1s; )Open 

Apple describes a new way to train image recognition using artificial imagery.

In machine learning research, using synthetic images (like those from a video game) to train neural networks can be more efficient than using real-world images. That's because synthetic image data is already labeled and annotated, while real-world image data requires somebody to exhaustively label everything the computer is seeing -- that's a tree, a dog, a bike. But the synthetic image approach can be problematic as what the algorithm learns doesn't always carry over neatly to real world scenes. The synthetic image data "is often not realistic enough, leading the network to learn details only present in synthetic images and fail to generalize well on real images," the paper from Apple says.

Apple describes a new way to train image recognition using artificial imagery.

In machine learning research, using synthetic images (like those from a video game) to train neural networks can be more efficient than using real-world images. That's because synthetic image data is already labeled and annotated, while real-world image data requires somebody to exhaustively label everything the computer is seeing -- that's a tree, a dog, a bike. But the synthetic image approach can be problematic as what the algorithm learns doesn't always carry over neatly to real world scenes. The synthetic image data "is often not realistic enough, leading the network to learn details only present in synthetic images and fail to generalize well on real images," the paper from Apple says.___

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2016-12-26 18:02:05 (43 comments; 14 reshares; 86 +1s; )Open 

DNA tests beautifully dissolve our racist assumptions about who we actually are.

HT +David Andrews​

___DNA tests beautifully dissolve our racist assumptions about who we actually are.

HT +David Andrews​

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2016-12-24 19:52:17 (14 comments; 9 reshares; 54 +1s; )Open 

My grandfather died seventeen years ago, but he is still very much with me. Our memories of others extend our relationships. Now technology is augmenting that process on some unexpected ways.

Today, many counsellors help mourners realise that their loved ones continue to be with them, in some sense, after they die. The relationship changes, but it is still there.


HT +Darius Gabriel Black​

___My grandfather died seventeen years ago, but he is still very much with me. Our memories of others extend our relationships. Now technology is augmenting that process on some unexpected ways.

Today, many counsellors help mourners realise that their loved ones continue to be with them, in some sense, after they die. The relationship changes, but it is still there.


HT +Darius Gabriel Black​

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2016-12-24 19:27:41 (11 comments; 6 reshares; 83 +1s; )Open 

Feels a little soulless to me, but here's a new Christmas carol developed with the help of machine learning.



Feels a little soulless to me, but here's a new Christmas carol developed with the help of machine learning.

___

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2016-12-23 18:47:48 (17 comments; 7 reshares; 57 +1s; )Open 

Wow. Technologists everywhere, please read this piece by +Om Malik​. He nails it.

The lack of empathy in technology design doesn’t exist because the people who write algorithms are heartless but perhaps because they lack the texture of reality outside the technology bubble.

Wow. Technologists everywhere, please read this piece by +Om Malik​. He nails it.

The lack of empathy in technology design doesn’t exist because the people who write algorithms are heartless but perhaps because they lack the texture of reality outside the technology bubble.___

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2016-12-23 18:30:59 (6 comments; 0 reshares; 7 +1s; )Open 

A look at a few of the problems Zappos is having making Holacracy with within their organization. If I were to sum it up on a few words, it would be too much of a focus on organizational process.

My critique of this article is that it unfairly ascribes the motivation for trying Holacracy as a desire to turn people into highly efficient software. That's simply not true. The goal behind the management system is to develop a non-hierarchical approach to managing an organization.

I have been watching some of these experiments over the past few years, hoping that they would work. Years ago, I actually met with the founder/visionary behind Holacracy while he was visiting Seattle. I was running a similar experiment with my own organization at the time, and running into problems. The core of the difficulties? Too much energy was going into process, and it was bogging us down.
... mehr »

A look at a few of the problems Zappos is having making Holacracy with within their organization. If I were to sum it up on a few words, it would be too much of a focus on organizational process.

My critique of this article is that it unfairly ascribes the motivation for trying Holacracy as a desire to turn people into highly efficient software. That's simply not true. The goal behind the management system is to develop a non-hierarchical approach to managing an organization.

I have been watching some of these experiments over the past few years, hoping that they would work. Years ago, I actually met with the founder/visionary behind Holacracy while he was visiting Seattle. I was running a similar experiment with my own organization at the time, and running into problems. The core of the difficulties? Too much energy was going into process, and it was bogging us down.

Hierarchy, it turns out, is a pretty efficient model for making decisions amongst a group of humans. It bothers me to say that, but it's true. It does have all kinds of drawbacks though. Some of these can be overcome with culture and process innovations, but that requires a management team that fully acknowledges these pitfalls from the get go.

I personally am of the belief that as our software systems get better, we may actually be able to make non-hierarchical management structures work, as software takes up some of the complexity and awkwardness of managing the process. Until then, I'm not going to bash leaders like Tony Hsieh for trying to make stuff like this work. It's a risky move, to be sure, but the intention behind it is laudable.___

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2016-12-23 07:23:40 (16 comments; 29 reshares; 95 +1s; )Open 

Really interesting look at how AI will soon infiltrate the financial sector, starting with hedge funds. Pay attention to the roles for humans in the system being described here. One example:

The company is already highly data-driven, with meetings recorded and staff asked to grade each other throughout the day using a ratings system called “dots”. The Systematized Intelligence Lab has built a tool that incorporates these ratings into “Baseball Cards” that show employees’ strengths and weaknesses. Another app, dubbed The Contract, gets staff to set goals they want to achieve and then tracks how effectively they follow through.

Really interesting look at how AI will soon infiltrate the financial sector, starting with hedge funds. Pay attention to the roles for humans in the system being described here. One example:

The company is already highly data-driven, with meetings recorded and staff asked to grade each other throughout the day using a ratings system called “dots”. The Systematized Intelligence Lab has built a tool that incorporates these ratings into “Baseball Cards” that show employees’ strengths and weaknesses. Another app, dubbed The Contract, gets staff to set goals they want to achieve and then tracks how effectively they follow through.___

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2016-12-23 00:33:54 (3 comments; 2 reshares; 54 +1s; )Open 

The Massive Flying Biomass of Insects

A total of 3.5 trillion insects weighing a combined 3,200 tons annually migrated annually over a region in south-central England monitored with specialized radar and a balloon-supported aerial netting system, the scientists said on Thursday.

In terms of biomass, the insects greatly exceeded migratory birds in Britain. Their biomass was seven times that of the 30 million songbirds flying from Britain to Africa each autumn.



The Massive Flying Biomass of Insects

A total of 3.5 trillion insects weighing a combined 3,200 tons annually migrated annually over a region in south-central England monitored with specialized radar and a balloon-supported aerial netting system, the scientists said on Thursday.

In terms of biomass, the insects greatly exceeded migratory birds in Britain. Their biomass was seven times that of the 30 million songbirds flying from Britain to Africa each autumn.

___

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2016-12-21 18:30:24 (8 comments; 7 reshares; 58 +1s; )Open 

Making Code Understandable, Accountable and Trusted Too

Thinking behind just usability:

I have another idea: It's time to stop designing digital services to just be easy to use and start designing them to be understandable, accountable, trusted, and easy to use.

"It just works" is not good enough anymore if you want your users to trust you with more data and make more decisions on their behalf; if you want users to start trusting their data in your machine learning system; and if you want users to trust your device in their house. This is the fundamental design decision facing people building digital services right now.
...
Imagine if Uber made it clear exactly how much a driver earned and whether it met a living wage, directly on the email receipt. Or if Amazon made it possible to understand supply chains and environmental impact when youb... mehr »

Making Code Understandable, Accountable and Trusted Too

Thinking behind just usability:

I have another idea: It's time to stop designing digital services to just be easy to use and start designing them to be understandable, accountable, trusted, and easy to use.

"It just works" is not good enough anymore if you want your users to trust you with more data and make more decisions on their behalf; if you want users to start trusting their data in your machine learning system; and if you want users to trust your device in their house. This is the fundamental design decision facing people building digital services right now.
...
Imagine if Uber made it clear exactly how much a driver earned and whether it met a living wage, directly on the email receipt. Or if Amazon made it possible to understand supply chains and environmental impact when you bought a product.
...
You can’t "view source" on Siri or Google Now. But as software agents of one sort or another (bots, digital assistants, news feed algorithms) start to make more decisions for us, publishing software tests may be useful for making bots more transparent.

HT +Pamela Pavliscak​ on Twitter.

___

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2016-12-18 05:21:46 (39 comments; 11 reshares; 75 +1s; )Open 

As of Friday, companies including Facebook, Apple, Google, IBM, Uber and Microsoft have all chimed in to likewise refuse to hand over data to help build a database that would profile Muslim-Americans, according to reports from BuzzFeed.

Any consumer tech company that agrees to participate in a citizen registry like what the incoming administration is taking about would be crushed by the market's response.

We all need to help ensure that.

As of Friday, companies including Facebook, Apple, Google, IBM, Uber and Microsoft have all chimed in to likewise refuse to hand over data to help build a database that would profile Muslim-Americans, according to reports from BuzzFeed.

Any consumer tech company that agrees to participate in a citizen registry like what the incoming administration is taking about would be crushed by the market's response.

We all need to help ensure that.___

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2016-12-17 16:51:17 (33 comments; 28 reshares; 133 +1s; )Open 

Why all the hype on artificial intelligence from the big players these days? Recruitment. Recruitment of staff and letting of outside developers to use their respective cloud computing platforms.


Why all the hype on artificial intelligence from the big players these days? Recruitment. Recruitment of staff and letting of outside developers to use their respective cloud computing platforms.
___

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2016-12-16 01:16:14 (3 comments; 7 reshares; 71 +1s; )Open 

AI and machine learning are going everywhere.

AI and machine learning are going everywhere.___

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2016-12-16 00:22:27 (2 comments; 6 reshares; 41 +1s; )Open 

Amazon Delivers Package 13 Minutes After Ordered!

Amazon continues to make waves by delivering a package just 13 minutes after it was first ordered in a trail run using Prime Air and drones in the UK. Amazon is unrelenting in its drive to both hack (i.e. disrupt) and comoditize the delivery aspect of its ordering service. Mashable has an interesting video which explains some of the technology behind it (hint: it is machine learning) - https://goo.gl/LImMqT Interesting times. 

Amazon Delivers Package 13 Minutes After Ordered!

Amazon continues to make waves by delivering a package just 13 minutes after it was first ordered in a trail run using Prime Air and drones in the UK. Amazon is unrelenting in its drive to both hack (i.e. disrupt) and comoditize the delivery aspect of its ordering service. Mashable has an interesting video which explains some of the technology behind it (hint: it is machine learning) - https://goo.gl/LImMqT Interesting times. ___

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2016-12-15 18:07:51 (8 comments; 0 reshares; 34 +1s; )Open 

One of the Scariest Long-term Consequences of this Election

"Donald Trump doesn't want to drain the swamp, he wants to drill in it."

Tump is filling is cabinet with big oil people, and it is one of the more depressing things about the changes now underway.

Yes, yes, I know -- US municipal governments still have a lot of impact on carbon emissions, but let's not kid ourselves: these appointees cannot be a good sign for our struggle to reverse climate change.

#climate #BigOil


One of the Scariest Long-term Consequences of this Election

"Donald Trump doesn't want to drain the swamp, he wants to drill in it."

Tump is filling is cabinet with big oil people, and it is one of the more depressing things about the changes now underway.

Yes, yes, I know -- US municipal governments still have a lot of impact on carbon emissions, but let's not kid ourselves: these appointees cannot be a good sign for our struggle to reverse climate change.

#climate #BigOil
___

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2016-12-13 17:17:12 (15 comments; 2 reshares; 53 +1s; )Open 

This is going to be an exceptional book. +David Amerland​has spent the last few years thinking about the performance of the human mind. He is interested in what makes someone capable of the kind of superhuman focus of a military sniper. Through interviewing a large number of real world snipers, David has assembled a picture of how real people train themselves to rewire their brains for the extraordinary. He has backed it up with deep dives into the latest science on what we know about how the brain works.

I'm really looking forward to this one, scheduled for release later next year.

How To Be Exceptional

What is, by now two and half years of my life has gone into the research, writing and re-writing of a book on how to be exceptional. Called The Sniper Mind it will be out next year (release date details to come). In the meantime if you want to be kept in the loop, access special white papers, insights and tip-sheets on the book itself, subscribe to the Notification List on the right hand side of the page. ___This is going to be an exceptional book. +David Amerland​has spent the last few years thinking about the performance of the human mind. He is interested in what makes someone capable of the kind of superhuman focus of a military sniper. Through interviewing a large number of real world snipers, David has assembled a picture of how real people train themselves to rewire their brains for the extraordinary. He has backed it up with deep dives into the latest science on what we know about how the brain works.

I'm really looking forward to this one, scheduled for release later next year.

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2016-12-12 02:36:20 (6 comments; 9 reshares; 40 +1s; )Open 

The Emerging Race for the Industrial Internet

This is an interesting overview of what is happening in the race between General Electric and Siemens to build the Industrial Internet. GE is attempting to build a broad, generic platform into which all industrial players can plug their solutions. If it works, this juggernaut will become a -- I don't know, what's bigger than a juggernaut? Uberjuggernaut? Juggerubernaut?

Lots of interesting parts to this, but I'm culling this as the most intriguing bit:

That technology allows manufacturers to create what David Gelernter, a pioneering computer scientist at Yale University, over two decades ago imagined as “mirror worlds”. GE wants to build a similar, “virtual twin” of every category of physical asset it sells, from locomotives to wind farms. This would allow engineers to test products before they arebuilt a... mehr »

The Emerging Race for the Industrial Internet

This is an interesting overview of what is happening in the race between General Electric and Siemens to build the Industrial Internet. GE is attempting to build a broad, generic platform into which all industrial players can plug their solutions. If it works, this juggernaut will become a -- I don't know, what's bigger than a juggernaut? Uberjuggernaut? Juggerubernaut?

Lots of interesting parts to this, but I'm culling this as the most intriguing bit:

That technology allows manufacturers to create what David Gelernter, a pioneering computer scientist at Yale University, over two decades ago imagined as “mirror worlds”. GE wants to build a similar, “virtual twin” of every category of physical asset it sells, from locomotives to wind farms. This would allow engineers to test products before they are built and also let them feed the virtual model with real-world data to improve performance. “A digital twin is not just a generic model but based on the exact conditions in the real world,” explains Ganesh Bell, chief digital officer at GE Power.

Imagine our industrial systems having a virtual ecosystem operating like an integrated new dimension of reality. In-synch with the physical layer, this new virtual layer would be much more flexible. It would model and simulate optimizations on a scale simply infeasible for the physical infrastructure itself. Out of this will come phenomenal efficiencies unlike anything we have seen heretofore.

This reminds me of Brian Arthur's vision for The Second Economy:
http://www.mckinsey.com/business-functions/strategy-and-corporate-finance/our-insights/the-second-economy

#IndustrialInternet #iot___

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2016-12-12 01:16:00 (7 comments; 6 reshares; 35 +1s; )Open 

As Trump pitches major investments in U.S. infrastructure, it helps to have a look. Some great maps laying out core aspects of U.S. rail, pipelines, air traffic, bridges, electric grid and water ways.

HT +John Verdon

___As Trump pitches major investments in U.S. infrastructure, it helps to have a look. Some great maps laying out core aspects of U.S. rail, pipelines, air traffic, bridges, electric grid and water ways.

HT +John Verdon

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2016-12-11 02:05:15 (11 comments; 22 reshares; 86 +1s; )Open 

A Communion of Subjects

This is one of the best things I've read recently in terms of understanding consciousness and experience. Here are some key excerpts, but do yourself a favor and read the full article:

That’s the key idea. Evolution has shaped us with perceptions that allow us to survive. They guide adaptive behaviors. But part of that involves hiding from us the stuff we don’t need to know. And that’s pretty much all of reality, whatever reality might be. If you had to spend all that time figuring it out, the tiger would eat you.

I’ve evolved these symbols to keep me alive, so I have to take them seriously. But it’s a logical flaw to think that if we have to take it seriously, we also have to take it literally.

Now, for the most interesting part:
I call it conscious realism: Objective reality is just conscious agents, justpoints of... mehr »

A Communion of Subjects

This is one of the best things I've read recently in terms of understanding consciousness and experience. Here are some key excerpts, but do yourself a favor and read the full article:

That’s the key idea. Evolution has shaped us with perceptions that allow us to survive. They guide adaptive behaviors. But part of that involves hiding from us the stuff we don’t need to know. And that’s pretty much all of reality, whatever reality might be. If you had to spend all that time figuring it out, the tiger would eat you.

I’ve evolved these symbols to keep me alive, so I have to take them seriously. But it’s a logical flaw to think that if we have to take it seriously, we also have to take it literally.

Now, for the most interesting part:
I call it conscious realism: Objective reality is just conscious agents, just points of view. Interestingly, I can take two conscious agents and have them interact, and the mathematical structure of that interaction also satisfies the definition of a conscious agent. This mathematics is telling me something. I can take two minds, and they can generate a new, unified single mind. Here’s a concrete example. We have two hemispheres in our brain. But when you do a split-brain operation, a complete transection of the corpus callosum, you get clear evidence of two separate consciousnesses. Before that slicing happened, it seemed there was a single unified consciousness. So it’s not implausible that there is a single conscious agent. And yet it’s also the case that there are two conscious agents there, and you can see that when they’re split. I didn’t expect that, the mathematics forced me to recognize this. It suggests that I can take separate observers, put them together and create new observers, and keep doing this ad infinitum. It’s conscious agents all the way down.

This is another way or saying what the non-dualist, Advaita tradition teaches, by the way (https://goo.gl/BBMcD2).

Oh, and if that doesn't blow your mind, just let this sink in:

It’s not that there’s a classical brain that does some quantum magic. It’s that there’s no brain! Quantum mechanics says that classical objects—including brains—don’t exist. So this is a far more radical claim about the nature of reality and does not involve the brain pulling off some tricky quantum computation. So even Penrose hasn’t taken it far enough. But most of us, you know, we’re born realists. We’re born physicalists. This is a really, really hard one to let go of.

#nondual #advaita #consciousness
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