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Gideon Rosenblatt

Gideon Rosenblatt Von Google bestätigt 

Grounding Machines in Humanity

Beschäftigung: I write about the future of the human experience in an era of machine intelligence.

Follower: 51,408

Cream of the Crop: 04/01/2012

Auf CircleCount.com aufgenommen: 12/25/2011That's the date, where Gideon Rosenblatt has been indexed by CircleCount.com.
This hasn't to be the date where the daily check has been started.
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Gideon Rosenblatt has been at 3 events

HostFollowersTitleDateGuestsLinks
Yifat Cohen87,849*Why does the ex-head of American Express Chairman’s Innovation Fund think our future is in “producerism,” not consumerism?* What does it even mean?!? _This Hangout is public so feel free to share and invite your friends._ Using frameworks +Steve Faktor developed such as the 4C’s of Innovation™ - Creativity, Capabilities, Culture, and Context - and the Creativity Cube™, Mr. Faktor deconstructs the current economic environment to reveal innovation opportunities and growth sectors – health and education in particular. *Although his initial scenario suggests doom and gloom for the U.S. and other markets, the future he envisions is ripe with opportunity.* *SO - How do You Get Innovation Right?* Well, if we're lucky (and we usually are), Steve will dive into his latest book Econovation and share with us a future we've taken for granted. *It empowers readers to think big, dream big, and conquer economic conditions that will paralyze others.*  *WE WILL TOUCH ON HOW TO* Capitalize on a market that will go from making nothing to making everything . . . for China. Use psychological pricing and some crafty tricks from Google to reduce reliance on tapped-out consumers. Sell to consumers whose new identities will be based on what they create, not what they buy, click or super-size. Seduce a desperate government to finance your business, then feed you pancakes in the morning. Motivate tomorrow’s employees with social currency instead of the green, depreciating kind. Upgrade your business and your kids with a little help from Mormons and kindergartners with hacksaws. *WHO IS STEVEN?* Developing B2B startups at @109499489972846579596  and corporate speaking about emerging producerism opportunities that I wrote about in my book @116385844146363178305 and Forbes column.  --------------------- #hangoutsonair   #americanexpress   #econovation   #interview   #entrepreneur   #entrepreneurship   #economy   #goodbusiness   #amazon   #fortune500   #gplusgotogal  How Global Trends Will Shape the Future of Innovation.2013-01-17 18:00:0046  
Yifat Cohen87,849*Google+ changes the Truth about social media marketing.* _This is a public Hangout, feel free to share and invite_ Have you noticed the date? *Today the world is ending.* And it's a wonderful, wonderful thing. *Everything you know*, or think you know, about online marketing, social media, engagement and where's the money is online - *is no longer true*. *IN THIS HANGOUTS WE ARE GOING TO MAKE SOME TRULY CONTROVERSIAL CLAIMS* @116901017556394771817 is going to show you why you should pay attention to Google+ now, if you want to make money online.  He'll show you why the *money is no longer in the list* How the conversation have moved from one-to-many to *many-to-many* How you can *broadcast your Hangouts simultaneously on hundreds of sites* And most of all - *how to position yourself in front of this trend that is going to turn the social media world upside down.* *BUT WHO IS ALEX MANDOSSIAN TO BE CLAIMING THIS?* His colleagues and students acknowledge him as the Warren Buffet of the Internet because of his unique ability to teach his students how to make BIG money with very little risk.  Alex has generated $243 million in sales and profits for his small business students, clients and joint venture partners since 1993.   Many of the business strategies you'll learn today transformed his annual income in 2001 to be a monthly income in 2003; and eventually daily income by 2006. These marketing principles helped him grow his student data base from 200 people to 20,000 during his first 2 years in business ... and to over 200,000 during the following 3 years. He has engaged with best-selling authors such as Jack Canfield, @112439370122733503773  @105578574150809713602 and @113217646903708244617 (4-Hr Work Wk) Business leaders such as Donald Trump, Vic Conant of Nightingale Conant and Ivan Misner, CEO of Business Network International, and celebs such as Larry King and Mohammad Ali to name a few. *As a family-centered entrepreneur who works from home*, his goal is to become the world’s 1st "work-at-home" billionaire, not just in Net Worth, but by creating 1,000 other Internet millionaires …The money is no longer in the list, so where is it?2012-12-20 18:00:0058  
Yifat Cohen87,849*How the social revolution is changing the way we do business.* We all keep hearing about how important it is to engage and build relationships - what does it really mean, and what tools are out there to help us master it? When @105103058358743760661 spoke at DreamForce he saw *a vision for a future of business information systems that is entirely based on relationships.* *ENGAGE OR DIE.* In this Hangout On Air, we'll dive into the topic of engagement with @105103058358743760661   as he explains what he calls "engagement leverage." This framework bridges the kind of internal engagement you need with employees with the external engagement you need with customers, suppliers, partners and other external stakeholders. It's a simple, yet surprisingly powerful way for thinking about the way your organization gets work done.  Gideon writes at Alchemy of Change about helping companies bring purpose and technology together into a more powerful source of competitive advantage. Gideon just came back from leading a panel on engagement at Salesforce's Dreamforce Conference (now the biggest tech conference in the world) and so in addition to talking with us about the engagement leverage model, he'll also share some of what he saw at Dreamforce. (http://www.salesforce.com/dreamforce/DF12/)DreamForce: what I learned about the relationship revolution.2012-10-04 18:00:0063  

Shared Circles, die Gideon Rosenblatt enthalten.

Shared Circles gibt es nicht mehr auf Google+, aber Du kannst Dir die Historie hier anschauen.

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Die Top Beiträge aus den letzten 50 Beiträgen

Die meisten Kommentare: 44

posted image

2017-07-16 12:25:57 (44 comments; 11 reshares; 75 +1s; )Open 

Just because we make a copy of ourselves doesn't mean our sense of self automatically migrates to it.

Die meisten Reshares: 41

posted image

2017-07-16 00:06:24 (42 comments; 41 reshares; 564 +1s; )Open 

AI Photo Editing

In other words, Google had one AI “photo editor” attempt to fix professional shots that had been randomly tampered with using an automated system that changed lighting and applied filters. Another model then tried to distinguish between the edited shot [and?] the original professional image. The end result is software that understands generalized qualities of good and bad photographs, which allows it to then be trained to edit raw images to improve them.

#MachinedAesthetic



Die meisten +1: 564

posted image

2017-07-16 00:06:24 (42 comments; 41 reshares; 564 +1s; )Open 

AI Photo Editing

In other words, Google had one AI “photo editor” attempt to fix professional shots that had been randomly tampered with using an automated system that changed lighting and applied filters. Another model then tried to distinguish between the edited shot [and?] the original professional image. The end result is software that understands generalized qualities of good and bad photographs, which allows it to then be trained to edit raw images to improve them.

#MachinedAesthetic



Die Letzten 50 Beiträge

posted image

2017-07-20 20:44:01 (6 comments; 1 reshares; 21 +1s; )Open 

"It's like Pinterest, Instagram, and my credit card had a baby and it's beautiful."

Ahhh... More consumption... Beautiful.

;)

As far away as this idea is from anything I would personally use, I'd give it a decent chance of success.

HT +Gregory Esau​ over on Twitter.

"It's like Pinterest, Instagram, and my credit card had a baby and it's beautiful."

Ahhh... More consumption... Beautiful.

;)

As far away as this idea is from anything I would personally use, I'd give it a decent chance of success.

HT +Gregory Esau​ over on Twitter.___

posted image

2017-07-20 01:19:38 (10 comments; 22 reshares; 46 +1s; )Open 

Robots as a Force for Good

Good interview with famed roboticist, Rodney Brooks. I like this part, and he's raising an important point about funding automation for social outcomes.


I’m a robotics guy, so every problem I think I can solve has a robotics solution. But what are the sorts of things that are important to humankind, which the current model of either large companies investing in or VCs investing in, aren’t going to solve? For instance: plastics in the ocean. It’s getting worse; it’s contaminating our food chain. But it’s the problem of the commons. Who is going to fund a startup company to get rid of plastics in the ocean?  Who’s going to fund that, because who’s going to [provide a return for those investors] down the line?

So I’m more interested in finding places where robotics can help the world but there’s no way currently ofgetting the resear... mehr »

Robots as a Force for Good

Good interview with famed roboticist, Rodney Brooks. I like this part, and he's raising an important point about funding automation for social outcomes.


I’m a robotics guy, so every problem I think I can solve has a robotics solution. But what are the sorts of things that are important to humankind, which the current model of either large companies investing in or VCs investing in, aren’t going to solve? For instance: plastics in the ocean. It’s getting worse; it’s contaminating our food chain. But it’s the problem of the commons. Who is going to fund a startup company to get rid of plastics in the ocean?  Who’s going to fund that, because who’s going to [provide a return for those investors] down the line?

So I’m more interested in finding places where robotics can help the world but there’s no way currently of getting the research or the applications funded.

___

posted image

2017-07-18 12:33:40 (13 comments; 14 reshares; 62 +1s; )Open 

Now That's Auto Pilot

AI system being tested to land planes in the event of pilot being incapacitated. What's interesting is it works like an after-market add on, rather than integrated, built-in solution. It relies on machine vision to read the instruments and a robotic arm to operate the controls.

Update:
Thanks to +Daniel Mitzlaff for pointing to the original with more accurate description:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=om18cOWFL3Q

HT +Uche Eke​ and +John Verdon​

___Now That's Auto Pilot

AI system being tested to land planes in the event of pilot being incapacitated. What's interesting is it works like an after-market add on, rather than integrated, built-in solution. It relies on machine vision to read the instruments and a robotic arm to operate the controls.

Update:
Thanks to +Daniel Mitzlaff for pointing to the original with more accurate description:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=om18cOWFL3Q

HT +Uche Eke​ and +John Verdon​

posted image

2017-07-18 02:52:18 (6 comments; 7 reshares; 29 +1s; )Open 

Robo Pain?

This isn't just an article; there's a video that's worth watching when you click through to the link. The topic? Should we imbue our robots with the ability to feel pain? It may well be that we need to be cruel to be kind, for there are many reasons why pain makes sense for robots. The ability to feel pain is one of the oldest sensory requirements of animals. It is baked into our nervous systems.

So why not our robots?

Thanks to +David Amerland for sharing and bringing this one to my attention.

Should We Make Robots Feel Vulnerable?

This is more than a trick question. Our sense of vulnerability informs the contextual parameters of our situation which then determines such responses as normal (because we feel safe) or aggressive (because we feel threatened).

Without a sense of pain robots may not be able to feel empathy and without some sort of empathy the advent of killer robots such as those designed by Kalashnikov (https://goo.gl/3tHhXc) may be a tad worrying.

h/t +Panah Rad for the Killer Robot post. ___Robo Pain?

This isn't just an article; there's a video that's worth watching when you click through to the link. The topic? Should we imbue our robots with the ability to feel pain? It may well be that we need to be cruel to be kind, for there are many reasons why pain makes sense for robots. The ability to feel pain is one of the oldest sensory requirements of animals. It is baked into our nervous systems.

So why not our robots?

Thanks to +David Amerland for sharing and bringing this one to my attention.

posted image

2017-07-17 18:11:58 (12 comments; 1 reshares; 13 +1s; )Open 

Who says Apple isn't innovating anymore?!?

#SnarkyUnnecessaryPosts


Who says Apple isn't innovating anymore?!?

#SnarkyUnnecessaryPosts
___

posted image

2017-07-16 14:27:07 (2 comments; 8 reshares; 57 +1s; )Open 

China's deep embrace of data gives it an edge on AI. 

China's deep embrace of data gives it an edge on AI. ___

posted image

2017-07-16 12:25:57 (44 comments; 11 reshares; 75 +1s; )Open 

Just because we make a copy of ourselves doesn't mean our sense of self automatically migrates to it.

Just because we make a copy of ourselves doesn't mean our sense of self automatically migrates to it.___

posted image

2017-07-16 00:06:24 (42 comments; 41 reshares; 564 +1s; )Open 

AI Photo Editing

In other words, Google had one AI “photo editor” attempt to fix professional shots that had been randomly tampered with using an automated system that changed lighting and applied filters. Another model then tried to distinguish between the edited shot [and?] the original professional image. The end result is software that understands generalized qualities of good and bad photographs, which allows it to then be trained to edit raw images to improve them.

#MachinedAesthetic



AI Photo Editing

In other words, Google had one AI “photo editor” attempt to fix professional shots that had been randomly tampered with using an automated system that changed lighting and applied filters. Another model then tried to distinguish between the edited shot [and?] the original professional image. The end result is software that understands generalized qualities of good and bad photographs, which allows it to then be trained to edit raw images to improve them.

#MachinedAesthetic

___

posted image

2017-07-15 15:20:46 (10 comments; 5 reshares; 25 +1s; )Open 

Inequality both within and between nations: the real threat of Artificial Intelligence

One way or another, we are going to have to start thinking about how to minimize the looming A.I.-fueled gap between the haves and the have-nots, both within and between nations. Or to put the matter more optimistically: A.I. is presenting us with an opportunity to rethink economic inequality on a global scale. These challenges are too far-ranging in their effects for any nation to isolate itself from the rest of the world.

Inequality both within and between nations: the real threat of Artificial Intelligence

One way or another, we are going to have to start thinking about how to minimize the looming A.I.-fueled gap between the haves and the have-nots, both within and between nations. Or to put the matter more optimistically: A.I. is presenting us with an opportunity to rethink economic inequality on a global scale. These challenges are too far-ranging in their effects for any nation to isolate itself from the rest of the world.___

posted image

2017-07-15 11:58:41 (0 comments; 14 reshares; 56 +1s; )Open 

Today we’re announcing the People + AI Research initiative (PAIR) which brings together researchers across Google to study and redesign the ways people interact with AI systems. The goal of PAIR is to focus on the "human side" of AI: the relationship between users and technology, the new applications it enables, and how to make it broadly inclusive. The goal isn’t just to publish research; we’re also releasing open source tools for researchers and other experts to use.

___Today we’re announcing the People + AI Research initiative (PAIR) which brings together researchers across Google to study and redesign the ways people interact with AI systems. The goal of PAIR is to focus on the "human side" of AI: the relationship between users and technology, the new applications it enables, and how to make it broadly inclusive. The goal isn’t just to publish research; we’re also releasing open source tools for researchers and other experts to use.

posted image

2017-07-14 23:40:34 (8 comments; 7 reshares; 46 +1s; )Open 

On Being an Ape

Really enjoyed reading this piece on what it's like to act an ape.

Most of the actors that do play apes have told me that it's been one of the most profound things they've done, because you have to be so honest with yourself. That has happened for me through this character Rocket. He is that open, vulnerable, grounded, connected, feeling creature that I aspire to be all the time. There's an honesty that is so fun to play. It's a profound experience, it really is.

On Being an Ape

Really enjoyed reading this piece on what it's like to act an ape.

Most of the actors that do play apes have told me that it's been one of the most profound things they've done, because you have to be so honest with yourself. That has happened for me through this character Rocket. He is that open, vulnerable, grounded, connected, feeling creature that I aspire to be all the time. There's an honesty that is so fun to play. It's a profound experience, it really is.___

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2017-07-14 14:38:06 (3 comments; 3 reshares; 28 +1s; )Open 

Our future intelligent systems will depend upon subjective human feedback. We will need reliable, cost-effective mechanisms for capturing human preferences and turning that information into the reward functions that teach our machine learning systems.



Our future intelligent systems will depend upon subjective human feedback. We will need reliable, cost-effective mechanisms for capturing human preferences and turning that information into the reward functions that teach our machine learning systems.

___

posted image

2017-07-13 15:14:37 (0 comments; 3 reshares; 18 +1s; )Open 

Democratizing motion capture with a $2,500 suite. The line between physical and virtual reality continues to blur.

Once this gets lower in price, we'll start to see more and more athletes using this to improve their performance too.

Democratizing motion capture with a $2,500 suite. The line between physical and virtual reality continues to blur.

Once this gets lower in price, we'll start to see more and more athletes using this to improve their performance too.___

posted image

2017-07-13 13:58:51 (12 comments; 11 reshares; 71 +1s; )Open 

Four challenges to AI's huge potential:
Compute power, coding skills, human distrust, and narrowness of applications.

Four challenges to AI's huge potential:
Compute power, coding skills, human distrust, and narrowness of applications.___

posted image

2017-07-12 21:08:45 (12 comments; 5 reshares; 22 +1s; )Open 

Enterprise G+: Tracking G+ Enduser Activity by Domain

Looks like the effects of Google+ moving into the GSuite team are becoming more clear. Organizations running Google+ for users within their domain will soon have the ability to track user adoption and engagement.

To be honest, I find this creepy. I mean, it's like your organization tracking your Facebook usage. I know that Facebook is moving into a similar domain-hosted experience with Workplace by Facebook, and maybe they're doing the exact same thing.

I could see something like this working if one were using Google+ with a work account so that everything you did on the service was in the service of your workplace. But, er, that feels like it's really breaking the real value of the network somehow. I mean the real value here is the ability to plug into lots of different shared interests. Would I come... mehr »

Enterprise G+: Tracking G+ Enduser Activity by Domain

Looks like the effects of Google+ moving into the GSuite team are becoming more clear. Organizations running Google+ for users within their domain will soon have the ability to track user adoption and engagement.

To be honest, I find this creepy. I mean, it's like your organization tracking your Facebook usage. I know that Facebook is moving into a similar domain-hosted experience with Workplace by Facebook, and maybe they're doing the exact same thing.

I could see something like this working if one were using Google+ with a work account so that everything you did on the service was in the service of your workplace. But, er, that feels like it's really breaking the real value of the network somehow. I mean the real value here is the ability to plug into lots of different shared interests. Would I come here simply to share stuff with workmates - and not use G+ the way that it's been designed to use? I don't think so. So the choice is then using it to follow my interests, and know that my employer is watching every move I make.

Maybe I'm missing something here.

___

posted image

2017-07-11 22:33:28 (14 comments; 17 reshares; 64 +1s; )Open 

A Future Where Machine Intelligence Reverts Back to Biology

This is a really interesting, if somewhat speculative, piece about intelligence in the Universe and the possibility that limits to machine-based computational processing might serve as a kind of cap to machine intelligence. The basic idea is that we might merge with machines, expand out into the Milky Way, and then collapse back into our neighborhood (or some other location) to return to a biological existence.

This article has been popped up, unread, in a tab in my browser for more than a week now. So it's quite possible that someone here on G+ was responsible for alerting me to this piece, but I've lost track of who. My apologies for not acknowledging you, if it was you. :)

#intelligence #life #alien

A Future Where Machine Intelligence Reverts Back to Biology

This is a really interesting, if somewhat speculative, piece about intelligence in the Universe and the possibility that limits to machine-based computational processing might serve as a kind of cap to machine intelligence. The basic idea is that we might merge with machines, expand out into the Milky Way, and then collapse back into our neighborhood (or some other location) to return to a biological existence.

This article has been popped up, unread, in a tab in my browser for more than a week now. So it's quite possible that someone here on G+ was responsible for alerting me to this piece, but I've lost track of who. My apologies for not acknowledging you, if it was you. :)

#intelligence #life #alien___

posted image

2017-07-11 17:07:01 (3 comments; 2 reshares; 32 +1s; )Open 

Keeping robotics on the down-low, at least at home.

Rather than being front and center, home robots, I believe, will follow computers into the shadows. Why? Because people don’t want robots. (I say this despite 30-plus years as a practicing roboticist.) Consumers want a spotless floor; not a machine buzzing around underfoot. Every morning, you want to find your dresser filled with clean clothes; you have no need to socialize with a laundry-bot no matter how exuberant it may be. People want the things a robot can do for them; the robot itself may just get in the way.___Keeping robotics on the down-low, at least at home.

posted image

2017-07-11 14:35:59 (1 comments; 2 reshares; 29 +1s; )Open 

Really practical advice on applying machine learning to user experience.

HT +Wayne Radinsky.

"Human-centered machine learning." 7 steps to stay focused on the user when designing with ML. Don't expect Machine learning to figure out what problems to solve. You have to find human needs. Ask yourself if ML will address the problem in a unique way. In what way might a theoretical human 'expert' perform the task today? Fake it with personal examples and wizards. For prototypes have a teammate imitate an ML system's actions like chat responses, movie suggestions, etc.

Weigh the costs of false positives and false negatives. Plan for co-learning and adaptation. To be valuable, your system will evolve over time in tandem with users' mental models. Teach your algorithm using the right labels. Making reasonable assumptions, discuss those assumptions with a diverse array of collaborators, make the hackiest prototype possible as quickly as possible in order to start gathering feedback and iterating, hire a handful of people who give the best feedback, and identify which assumptions feeling "truthier" than others before you go big and start investing in large-scale data collection and labeling. Don't micromanage and getting too prescriptive too quickly which may result in unintentionally anchoring.___Really practical advice on applying machine learning to user experience.

HT +Wayne Radinsky.

posted image

2017-07-08 19:58:34 (2 comments; 2 reshares; 14 +1s; )Open 

Using Infrared Light to Disrupt Medical Imaging

This looks like it could be a game-changer. This video is an interview with Dr. Mary Lou Jepsen, the CEO of Openwater. The basic idea behind this technology is using liquid crystal display (LCD) technology to project infrared light into the human body and then process the scattering of that light as a way to generate images that are comparable to Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI).

Assuming this works, the devices would look like ski caps, bandages, and just plain old clothing. Current estimates are that it is 5-8 years away from commercial availability. Applications could include much less expensive medical imaging that wouldn't be tied to large machines, but instead be with us all the time. Also, being able to read brain patterns, which is why this video is provocatively titled "telepathy meets medical imaging."... mehr »

Using Infrared Light to Disrupt Medical Imaging

This looks like it could be a game-changer. This video is an interview with Dr. Mary Lou Jepsen, the CEO of Openwater. The basic idea behind this technology is using liquid crystal display (LCD) technology to project infrared light into the human body and then process the scattering of that light as a way to generate images that are comparable to Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI).

Assuming this works, the devices would look like ski caps, bandages, and just plain old clothing. Current estimates are that it is 5-8 years away from commercial availability. Applications could include much less expensive medical imaging that wouldn't be tied to large machines, but instead be with us all the time. Also, being able to read brain patterns, which is why this video is provocatively titled "telepathy meets medical imaging."

It strikes me that much of the trick here will prove to be in interpreting the massive of amounts of data generated by these devices -- and that is going to be a large-scale software problem that will be well-suited to machine learning.

More background on Openwater, the company that is commercializing this technology:
https://www.opnwatr.io/
___

posted image

2017-07-04 16:00:23 (7 comments; 13 reshares; 71 +1s; )Open 

The extraordinary images produced in Cardiff are the result of a special MRI scanner - one of only three in the world.

The scanner itself is not especially powerful, but its ability to vary its magnetic field rapidly with position means the scientists can map the wires - the axons - so thinly it would take 50 of them to match the thickness of a human hair.

What the brain's wiring looks like

"The world's most detailed scan of the brain's internal wiring has been produced by scientists at Cardiff University.

The MRI machine reveals the fibres which carry all the brain's thought processes.

It's been done in Cardiff, Nottingham, Cambridge and Stockport, as well as London England and London Ontario.

Doctors hope it will help increase understanding of a range of neurological disorders and could be used instead of invasive biopsies..."

#future = #REALnews #health #medicine #medtech #wellness #tech #innovation #science #design #biotech #biology #singularity #engineering #ai #artificialintelligence #robots #automation

http://www.bbc.com/news/health-40488545___The extraordinary images produced in Cardiff are the result of a special MRI scanner - one of only three in the world.

The scanner itself is not especially powerful, but its ability to vary its magnetic field rapidly with position means the scientists can map the wires - the axons - so thinly it would take 50 of them to match the thickness of a human hair.

posted image

2017-06-29 20:31:40 (8 comments; 2 reshares; 18 +1s; )Open 

+Mark Bruce​ does an amazing job of summarizing the new +Kevin Kelly​ book. Makes me want to read it.

The Inevitable: Understanding the 12 Technological Forces that will Shape Our Future
by Kevin Kelly

Kevin Kelly’s The Inevitable explores the technological trends that got us to where we are today and that continue to push us and evolve our society along certain paths into the future. This is quintessential Kevin Kelly at his best, weaving powerful metaphor and technological poetry to present a compelling narrative for our civilisation, our species, and our role in the future. While specific technologies and their projected evolution into the future are discussed, these are only incidental, a footnote, used to flesh out the main trends and forces that act on all technologies to enhance their fitness by virtue of their role as pervasive selection mechanisms operating throughout the technium and the holos. Success will come to those who tend to work with these forces, not against them.

Definitely worth a read from both a futurism and philosophy of technology perspective, but also for any entrepreneur or product developer seeking to build successful businesses and products now and in the future.

Selected Highlights & Excerpts:

Technology is humanity’s accelerant. Because of technology everything we make is always in the process of becoming. Every kind of thing is becoming something else, while it churns from “might” to “is.” All is flux. Nothing is finished. Nothing is done. This never-ending change is the pivotal axis of the modern world.

Constant flux means more than simply “things will be different.” It means processes—the engines of flux—are now more important than products. Our greatest invention in the past 200 years was not a particular gadget or tool but the invention of the scientific process itself. Once we invented the scientific method, we could immediately create thousands of other amazing things we could have never discovered any other way. This methodical process of constant change and improvement was a million times better than inventing any particular product, because the process generated a million new products over the centuries since we invented it.

This shift toward processes also means ceaseless change is the fate for everything we make. We are moving away from the world of fixed nouns and toward a world of fluid verbs. In the next 30 years we will continue to take solid things—an automobile, a shoe—and turn them into intangible verbs. Products will become services and processes.

A world without discomfort is utopia. But it is also stagnant. A world perfectly fair in some dimensions would be horribly unfair in others. A utopia has no problems to solve, but therefore no opportunities either. Every utopian scenario contains self-corrupting flaws.

Real dystopias are more like the old Soviet Union rather than Mad Max: They are stiflingly bureaucratic rather than lawless.

The problems of today were caused by yesterday’s technological successes, and the technological solutions to today’s problems will cause the problems of tomorrow. This circular expansion of both problems and solutions hides a steady accumulation of small net benefits over time.

Today truly is a wide-open frontier. We are all becoming. It is the best time ever in human history to begin. You are not late.

The AI on the horizon looks more like Amazon Web Services—cheap, reliable, industrial-grade digital smartness running behind everything, and almost invisible except when it blinks off. This common utility will serve you as much IQ as you want but no more than you need. You’ll simply plug into the grid and get AI as if it was electricity.

Our most important mechanical inventions are not machines that do what humans do better, but machines that can do things we can’t do at all. Our most important thinking machines will not be machines that can think what we think faster, better, but those that think what we can’t think.

This is not a race against the machines. If we race against them, we lose. This is a race with the machines.

This total sequence of perpetual upgrades is continuous. It’s a dream come true for our insatiable human appetite: rivers of uninterrupted betterment.

Early gramophone equipment could make recordings that contained no more than four and a half minutes, so musicians abbreviated meandering works to fit to the phonograph, and today the standard duration of a pop song is four and a half minutes.

When copies are superabundant, they become worthless. Instead, stuff that can’t be copied becomes scarce and valuable. When copies are free, you need to sell things that cannot be copied. Trust, for instance. Trust cannot be reproduced in bulk. Trust must be earned, over time. It cannot be faked.

Why would anyone ever pay for something they could get for free? And when they pay for something they could get for free, what are they purchasing? In a real sense, these uncopyable values are things that are “better than free.”

Notions don’t stand alone but are massively interlinked to everything else; truth is not delivered by authors and authorities but is assembled in real time piece by piece by the audience themselves. People of the Screen make their own content and construct their own truth.

Some scholars of literature claim that a book is really that virtual place your mind goes to when you are reading. It is a conceptual state of imagination that one might call “literature space.” According to these scholars, when you are engaged in this reading space, your brain works differently than when you are screening. One can spend hours reading on the web and never encounter this literature space. One gets fragments, threads, glimpses.

Wikipedia is the first networked book. In the goodness of time, each Wikipedia page will become saturated with blue links as every statement is cross-referenced. In the goodness of time, as all books become fully digital, every one of them will accumulate the equivalent of blue underlined passages as each literary reference is networked within that book out to all other books. Each page in a book will discover other pages and other books. Thus books will seep out of their bindings and weave themselves together into one large metabook, the universal library. The resulting collective intelligence of this synaptically connected library allows us to see things we can’t see in a single isolated book.

Science is on a long-term campaign to bring all knowledge in the world into one vast, interconnected, footnoted, peer-reviewed web of facts. Independent facts, even those that make sense in their own world, are of little value to science.

We’ll unbundle books into their constituent bits and pieces and knit those into the web, but the higher-level organization of the book will be the focus for our attention—that remaining scarcity in our economy. A book is an attention unit. A fact is interesting, an idea is important, but only a story, a good argument, a well-crafted narrative is amazing, never to be forgotten.

More important, our screens will also watch us. They will be our mirrors, the wells into which we look to find out about ourselves. Not to see our faces, but ourselves.

Every year I own less of what I use. Possession is not as important as it once was. Accessing is more important than ever. Instant borrowing gives you most of the benefits of owning and few of its disadvantages. Access is so superior to ownership in many ways that it is driving the frontiers of the economy.

On average most modern products have undergone dematerialization. The reason even solid physical goods—like a soda can—can deliver more benefits while inhabiting less material is because their heavy atoms are substituted by weightless bits. The tangible is replaced by intangibles—intangibles like better design, innovative processes, smart chips, and eventually online connectivity—that do the work that more aluminum atoms used to do. Soft things, like intelligence, are thus embedded into hard things, like aluminum, that make hard things behave more like software. Material goods infused with bits increasingly act as if they were intangible services. Nouns morph to verbs. Hardware behaves like software. In Silicon Valley they say it like this: “Software eats everything.”

The general approach for entrepreneurs is to unbundle the benefits of transportation (or any X) into separate constituent goods and then recombine them in new ways. These startups try to exploit inefficiencies in novel ways. They take assets that are unused part-time (such as an empty bedroom, a parked car, unused office space) and match them to people eagerly waiting for them right this second.

In other words, the long-term trend in our modern lives is that most goods and services will be short-term use. Therefore most goods and services are candidates for rental and sharing.

Nearly every aspect of modern civilization has been flattening down except one: money. Minting money is one of the last jobs left for a central government that most political parties agree is legitimate. What if you created a distributed currency that was secure, accurate, and trustworthy without centralization? Because if money could be decentralized, then anything can be decentralized. Bitcoin is a fully decentralized, distributed currency that does not need a central bank for its accuracy, enforcement, or regulation. The blockchain is a radical invention that can decentralize many other systems beyond money.

A platform is a foundation created by a firm that lets other firms build products and services upon it. It is neither market nor firm, but something new. Levels of highly interdependent products and services form an “ecosystem” that rests upon the platform. “Ecosystem” is a good description because, just as in a forest, the success of one species (product) depends on the success of others.

The web is hyperlinked documents; the cloud is hyperlinked data. Ultimately the chief reason to put things onto the cloud is to share their data deeply.

If a cloud company restricts or censors our actions, we’ll feel pain. Separation from the comfort and new identity afforded by the cloud will be horrendous and unbearable. If McLuhan is right that tools are extensions of our selves—a wheel an extended leg, a camera an extended eye—then the cloud is our extended soul. Or, if you prefer, our extended self.

There are practical limits to how gigantic one company’s cloud can get, so the next step in the rise of clouds over the coming decades will be toward merging the clouds into one intercloud. Just as the internet is the network of networks, the intercloud is the cloud of clouds.

Editors are the middle people—or what are called “curators” today—the professionals between a creator and the audience.

Yet if the hive mind is so dumb, why bother with it at all? Because as dumb as it is, it is smart enough for a lot of work. Given enough time, decentralized connected dumb things can become smarter than we think. Even though a purely decentralized power won’t take us all the way, it is almost always the best way to start. It’s fast, cheap, and out of control.

Anything that can be shared—thoughts, emotions, money, health, time—will be shared in the right conditions, with the right benefits. Anything that can be shared can be shared better, faster, easier, longer, and in a million more ways than we currently realize. At this point in our history, sharing something that has not been shared before, or in a new way, is the surest way to increase its value.

The danger of being rewarded with only what you already like, however, is that you can spin into an egotistical spiral, becoming blind to anything slightly different, even if you’d love it. This is called a filter bubble. The technical term is “overfitting.” You get stuck at a lower than optimal peak because you behave as if you have arrived at the top, ignoring the adjacent environment. There’s a lot of evidence this occurs in the political realm as well: Readers of one political stripe who depend only on a simple filter of “more like this” rarely if ever read books outside their stripe. This overfitting tends to harden their minds. This kind of filter-induced self-reinforcement also occurs in science, the arts, and culture at large. The more effective the “more good stuff like this” filter is, the more important it becomes to alloy it with other types of filters.

Every filter throws something good away. Filtering is a type of censoring, and vice versa. The inadequacies of a filter cannot be remedied by eliminating filters. The inadequacies of a filter can be remedied only by applying countervailing filters upon it. From the human point of view, a filter focuses content. But seen in reverse, from the content point of view, a filter focuses human attention.

“In an information-rich world, the wealth of information means a dearth of something else: a scarcity of whatever it is that information consumes. What information consumes is rather obvious: it consumes the attention of its recipients. Hence a wealth of information creates a poverty of attention.” Simon’s insight is often reduced to “In a world of abundance, the only scarcity is human attention.”

The filters have been watching us for years; they anticipate what we will ask. They can almost autocomplete it right now. Thing is, we don’t know what we want. We don’t know ourselves very well. To some degree we will rely on the filters to tell us what we want. Not as slave masters, but as a mirror. We’ll listen to the suggestions and recommendations that are generated by our own behavior in order to hear, to see who we are.

Modern technologies are combinations of earlier primitive technologies that have been rearranged and remixed. Since one can combine hundreds of simpler technologies with hundreds of thousands of more complex technologies, there is an unlimited number of possible new technologies—but they are all remixes.

The entire global economy is tipping away from the material and toward intangible bits. It is moving away from ownership and toward access. It is tilting away from the value of copies and toward the value of networks. It is headed for the inevitability of constant, relentless, and increasing remixing. The laws will be slow to follow, but they will follow.

Appropriation of existing material is a venerable and necessary practice. As the economists Romer and Arthur remind us, recombination is really the only source of innovation—and wealth. I suggest we follow the question, “Has it been transformed by the borrower?” Did the remixing, the mashup, the sampling, the appropriation, the borrowing—did it transform the original rather than just copy it?

A quantified-self experiment, on the other hand, is just N=1. The subject is yourself. At first it may seem that an N=1 experiment is not scientifically valid, but it turns out that it is extremely valid to you. In many ways it is the ideal experiment because you are testing the variable X against the very particular subject that is your body and mind at one point in time. Who cares whether the treatment works on anyone else? What you want to know is, How does it affect me? An N=1 provides that laser-focused result. The problem with an N=1 experiment (which was once standard procedure for all medicine before the age of science) is not that the results aren’t useful (they are), but that it is very easy to fool yourself.

In formal studies, you need a control group to offset your bias toward positive results. So in lieu of a control group in an N=1 study, a quantified-self experimenter uses his or her own baseline. If you track yourself long enough, with a wide variety of metrics, then you can establish your behavior outside (or before) the experiment, which effectively functions as the control for comparison.

The growth of information has been steadily increasing at an insane rate for at least a century. It is no coincidence that 66 percent per year is the same as doubling every 18 months, which is the rate of Moore’s Law. Five years ago humanity stored several hundred exabytes of information. That is the equivalent of each person on the planet having 80 Library of Alexandrias. Today we average 320 libraries each. There’s another way to visualize this growth: as an information explosion. Every second of every day we globally manufacture 6,000 square meters of information storage material—disks, chips, DVDs, paper, film—which we promptly fill up with data. That rate—6,000 square meters per second—is the approximate velocity of the shock wave radiating from an atomic explosion. Information is expanding at the rate of a nuclear explosion, but unlike a real atomic explosion, which lasts only seconds, this information explosion is perpetual, a nuclear blast lasting many decades.

Metadata is the new wealth because the value of bits increases when they are linked to other bits. The least productive life for a bit is to remain naked and alone. A bit uncopied, unshared, unlinked with other bits will be a short-lived bit. The worst future for a bit is to be parked in some dark isolated data vault. What bits really want is to hang out with other related bits, be replicated widely, and maybe become a metabit, or an action bit in a piece of durable code. If we could personify bits, we’d say: Bits want to move. Bits want to be linked to other bits. Bits want to be reckoned in real time. Bits want to be duplicated, replicated, copied. Bits want to be meta.

Anonymity enables the occasional whistle-blower and can protect the persecuted fringe and political outcasts. But if anonymity is present in any significant quantity, it will poison the system. While anonymity can be used to protect heroes, it is far more commonly used as a way to escape responsibility. A lack of responsibility unleashes the worst in us.

Just as fleshy tissue yields a new, higher level of organization for a bunch of individual cells, these new social structures yield new tissue for individual humans. Tissue can do things that cells can’t. The collectivist organizations of Wikipedia, Linux, Facebook, Uber, the web—even AI—can do things that industrialized humans could not.

Every minute a new impossible thing is uploaded to the internet and that improbable event becomes just one of hundreds of extraordinary events that we’ll see or hear about today. The internet is like a lens that focuses the extraordinary into a beam, and that beam has become our illumination. It compresses the unlikely into a small viewable band of everydayness.

Ironically, in an age of instant global connection, my certainty about anything has decreased. Rather than receiving truth from an authority, I am reduced to assembling my own certainty from the liquid stream of facts flowing through the web. Truth, with a capital T, becomes truths, plural. I have to sort the truths not just about things I care about, but about anything I touch, including areas about which I can’t possibly have any direct knowledge. That means that in general I have to constantly question what I think I know. We might consider this state perfect for the advancement of science, but it also means that I am more likely to have my mind changed for incorrect reasons.

I’ve noticed a different approach to my thinking now that the hive mind has spread it extremely wide and loose. My thinking is more active, less contemplative. Rather than begin a question or hunch by ruminating aimlessly in my mind, nourished only by my ignorance, I start doing things. I immediately go. I go looking, searching, asking, questioning, reacting, leaping in, constructing notes, bookmarks, a trail—I start off making something mine. I don’t wait. Don’t have to wait. I act on ideas first now instead of thinking on them. For some folks, this is the worst of the net—the loss of contemplation.

Thus, even though our knowledge is expanding exponentially, our questions are expanding exponentially faster. And as mathematicians will tell you, the widening gap between two exponential curves is itself an exponential curve. That gap between questions and answers is our ignorance, and it is growing exponentially. In other words, science is a method that chiefly expands our ignorance rather than our knowledge.

I asked it how many searches all search engines do per second? It said 600,000 searches per second, or 600 kilohertz. The internet is answering questions at the buzzing frequency of radio waves.

There is an asymmetry in the work needed to generate a good question versus the work needed to absorb an answer. Answers become cheap and questions become valuable—the inverse of the situation now.

A good question is not concerned with a correct answer. A good question cannot be answered immediately. A good question challenges existing answers. A good question is one you badly want answered once you hear it, but had no inkling you cared before it was asked. A good question creates new territory of thinking. A good question reframes its own answers. A good question is the seed of innovation in science, technology, art, politics, and business. A good question is a probe, a what-if scenario. A good question skirts on the edge of what is known and not known, neither silly nor obvious. A good question cannot be predicted. A good question will be the sign of an educated mind. A good question is one that generates many other good questions. A good question may be the last job a machine will learn to do. A good question is what humans are for.


___+Mark Bruce​ does an amazing job of summarizing the new +Kevin Kelly​ book. Makes me want to read it.

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2017-06-29 14:09:08 (4 comments; 7 reshares; 37 +1s; )Open 

More Meaningful Jobs

This piece by Rutger Bregman on automation and the future of work nails it. It's pretty close to how I see it too.

I believe in a future where the value of your work is not determined by the size of your paycheck, but by the amount of happiness you spread and the amount of meaning you give. I believe in a future where the point of education is not to prepare you for another useless job, but for a life well lived. I believe in a future where “jobs are for robots and life is for people.”



More Meaningful Jobs

This piece by Rutger Bregman on automation and the future of work nails it. It's pretty close to how I see it too.

I believe in a future where the value of your work is not determined by the size of your paycheck, but by the amount of happiness you spread and the amount of meaning you give. I believe in a future where the point of education is not to prepare you for another useless job, but for a life well lived. I believe in a future where “jobs are for robots and life is for people.”

___

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2017-06-28 22:11:26 (20 comments; 5 reshares; 24 +1s; )Open 

New Netflix movie, Okja uses a "Mutant Super Pig" to display capitalism, consumption and industrial slaughterhouses.

New Netflix movie, Okja uses a "Mutant Super Pig" to display capitalism, consumption and industrial slaughterhouses.___

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2017-06-28 16:08:44 (9 comments; 5 reshares; 62 +1s; )Open 

Rethinking Intelligence

When we see displays of non-human intelligence in nature, the instinctive response is awe. These glimpses of the beauty and diversity of Earthly intelligence help us know in a most visceral way that intelligence is much bigger than humanity.

I believe that one of the most important lessons we will learn through machine intelligence is that intelligence is larger than any human categories of artificial or natural. As a species, we are about to broaden our understanding of intelligence through the novelty, surprise, and wonder that systems like AlphaGo generate from our seeds of thought.


Rethinking Intelligence

When we see displays of non-human intelligence in nature, the instinctive response is awe. These glimpses of the beauty and diversity of Earthly intelligence help us know in a most visceral way that intelligence is much bigger than humanity.

I believe that one of the most important lessons we will learn through machine intelligence is that intelligence is larger than any human categories of artificial or natural. As a species, we are about to broaden our understanding of intelligence through the novelty, surprise, and wonder that systems like AlphaGo generate from our seeds of thought.
___

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2017-06-27 13:21:31 (3 comments; 8 reshares; 35 +1s; )Open 

LegalTech

Nope. "LegalTech" isn't some new designation for what you can carry on flights these days, it's like "FinTech" -- technology to automate an industry. In this case, it's the legal field, and like most fields, the automation is happening task by task, rather than rolling out job by job:

"While there are functions of AI that are very well-suited to replacing many of the more defined tasks, legal practice requires advanced cognitive abilities and problem-solving skills in environments of legal and factual uncertainty."

LegalTech

Nope. "LegalTech" isn't some new designation for what you can carry on flights these days, it's like "FinTech" -- technology to automate an industry. In this case, it's the legal field, and like most fields, the automation is happening task by task, rather than rolling out job by job:

"While there are functions of AI that are very well-suited to replacing many of the more defined tasks, legal practice requires advanced cognitive abilities and problem-solving skills in environments of legal and factual uncertainty."___

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2017-06-26 22:47:27 (10 comments; 4 reshares; 35 +1s; )Open 

Talent Risk Management

Companies think about succession planning, but this is usually only concerned with the very top tiers of the company. Talent Risk Management drives this kind of longer-term orientation and planning lower down into the org chart for a much more comprehensive analysis of the organization’s true talent vulnerabilities.

Steve Trautman knows a lot about the intersection of people and knowledge. This book, his third, is as informative as it is pragmatic.

If you are in organizational management, I recommend getting this book. It's a fast read, and it will leave you with a concrete understanding of how to think more clearly about your people, what they bring to your organization -- and how you deal with the comings and goings that are now so common in today's workforce.

Here's the link on Amazon: https://goo.gl/XPcndimehr »

Talent Risk Management

Companies think about succession planning, but this is usually only concerned with the very top tiers of the company. Talent Risk Management drives this kind of longer-term orientation and planning lower down into the org chart for a much more comprehensive analysis of the organization’s true talent vulnerabilities.

Steve Trautman knows a lot about the intersection of people and knowledge. This book, his third, is as informative as it is pragmatic.

If you are in organizational management, I recommend getting this book. It's a fast read, and it will leave you with a concrete understanding of how to think more clearly about your people, what they bring to your organization -- and how you deal with the comings and goings that are now so common in today's workforce.

Here's the link on Amazon: https://goo.gl/XPcndi

___

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2017-06-26 16:57:05 (8 comments; 7 reshares; 39 +1s; )Open 

Speculation on Whole Foods Inventory Automation

Last I heard, the deal wasn't sealed, but that doesn't stop lots of interesting speculation on how an Amazon acquisition of Whole Foods might affect the future of retail.

This piece looks at some of the potential impact on Whole Foods inventory management.

The other day, I had this related, little vision of what the future of Whole Foods shopping might look like:

You leave your home with your meals for the week already planned in your favorite recipe app(s). You walk into the store and your phone buzzes, asking for confirmation that you want to fulfill your meal plan shopping. It also asks you to confirm that you want to top off your pantry's supplies of any snacks and other stuff that Amazon's smart algorithms calculate are nearly empty at home. Then, as you spend some time doing the more... mehr »

Speculation on Whole Foods Inventory Automation

Last I heard, the deal wasn't sealed, but that doesn't stop lots of interesting speculation on how an Amazon acquisition of Whole Foods might affect the future of retail.

This piece looks at some of the potential impact on Whole Foods inventory management.

The other day, I had this related, little vision of what the future of Whole Foods shopping might look like:

You leave your home with your meals for the week already planned in your favorite recipe app(s). You walk into the store and your phone buzzes, asking for confirmation that you want to fulfill your meal plan shopping. It also asks you to confirm that you want to top off your pantry's supplies of any snacks and other stuff that Amazon's smart algorithms calculate are nearly empty at home. Then, as you spend some time doing the more interesting aspects of shopping, like picking your fresh fruits and vegetables, meats, bakery items and prepared foods, robots whir away in the back room, pulling together a smart cart that will meet you at check out. In it will be all of the stuff your recipe ingredients require and the products of other, more commodity-like topping-off aspects of shopping. You'll bring your much smaller hand basket of fruit, veggies, meats and other hand-picked stuff up with you, and you will just walk out the door, with everything paid for automatically.

The focus of your interactions with Whole Foods employees through all of this will be more along the lines of helping you pick the freshest, best-tasting and healthiest produce. They may even begin helping you to think about your diet and various healthier alternatives to the selections already in your cart and on your list. Whole Foods will have removed the drudgerous aspects of the work and focused its employees on more interesting, intelligent and social aspects of its mission.

That's one way it could play out at least. :)
___

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2017-06-26 13:01:19 (0 comments; 1 reshares; 13 +1s; )Open 

Nanotherapeutics design and build smart packaging for existing drugs.

___Nanotherapeutics design and build smart packaging for existing drugs.

2017-06-25 19:23:41 (5 comments; 1 reshares; 12 +1s; )Open 

Walt Whitman taking about "loafing," which today we might describe as "Being."

Walt Whitman taking about "loafing," which today we might describe as "Being."___

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2017-06-25 16:39:33 (7 comments; 11 reshares; 58 +1s; )Open 

The e-commerce giant imagines beehive-like towers filled with robots, where drones can dock and be restocked before flying out again for another delivery.

The e-commerce giant imagines beehive-like towers filled with robots, where drones can dock and be restocked before flying out again for another delivery.___

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2017-06-25 01:22:08 (14 comments; 21 reshares; 117 +1s; )Open 

DeepMind Auto-Generates Images from Textual Descriptions

I'm still digesting this one but wanted to share it in the mean time. DeepMind is building algorithms that auto-generate imagery based on textual cues. Input "orange-bodied, black-headed bird and it generates a small, photo-realistic image of just such a bird.

More background here:
https://futurism.com/googles-deepmind-now-capable-creating-images-sentences/

I'm trying to track down the original paper and will update this post should I locate it. 

DeepMind Auto-Generates Images from Textual Descriptions

I'm still digesting this one but wanted to share it in the mean time. DeepMind is building algorithms that auto-generate imagery based on textual cues. Input "orange-bodied, black-headed bird and it generates a small, photo-realistic image of just such a bird.

More background here:
https://futurism.com/googles-deepmind-now-capable-creating-images-sentences/

I'm trying to track down the original paper and will update this post should I locate it. ___

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2017-06-24 19:53:31 (3 comments; 1 reshares; 40 +1s; )Open 

Can I maybe get a "Yes"? :)


Can I maybe get a "Yes"? :)
___

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2017-06-24 19:48:03 (22 comments; 15 reshares; 56 +1s; )Open 

Highly-Sensitive People

Thanks to +George Kao for introducing me to the concept of a Highly Sensitive Person, or HSP. I'd never heard of the idea before today. I see aspects of this frame of being showing up in lots of individuals and in lots of different contexts -- including ones in which I find myself.

There is great beauty in being able to genuinely feel the world. To dismiss this mode of experience as simply that of a 'fragile snowflake' is to misunderstand the nature of life.

Chances are good that you either live with one, work with one, are friends with one, or are yourself a Highly Sensitive Person...

I found this TEDx talk to be a helpful introduction to what an #HSP is. I think I might be on the spectrum ✨

As #AI and #Robotization continues to take over society, maybe the HSP will become one of our key human evolutionary advantages...

#highlysensitivepeople___Highly-Sensitive People

Thanks to +George Kao for introducing me to the concept of a Highly Sensitive Person, or HSP. I'd never heard of the idea before today. I see aspects of this frame of being showing up in lots of individuals and in lots of different contexts -- including ones in which I find myself.

There is great beauty in being able to genuinely feel the world. To dismiss this mode of experience as simply that of a 'fragile snowflake' is to misunderstand the nature of life.

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2017-06-23 19:10:41 (3 comments; 6 reshares; 25 +1s; )Open 

A Peek at the Future of AI Governance

OpenAI and Google's DeepMind recently published some really interesting research on a new approach to using human preferences in shaping machine learning algorithms.

In this piece, I dissect this research to try to make it easier to understand and then investigate some of its implications. The biggest, I think, has to do with how we humans might govern AI in the future. And that's important stuff.

#MachineTraining #MachineLearning #Governance #AI




P.S. Yes, I shared an earlier version of this but made some tweaks and so am re-sharing. 

A Peek at the Future of AI Governance

OpenAI and Google's DeepMind recently published some really interesting research on a new approach to using human preferences in shaping machine learning algorithms.

In this piece, I dissect this research to try to make it easier to understand and then investigate some of its implications. The biggest, I think, has to do with how we humans might govern AI in the future. And that's important stuff.

#MachineTraining #MachineLearning #Governance #AI




P.S. Yes, I shared an earlier version of this but made some tweaks and so am re-sharing. ___

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2017-06-23 19:03:30 (6 comments; 0 reshares; 13 +1s; )Open 

Even though I'm not wild about the lyrics (hey, I'm his dad...), I have to say that this is my all-time favorite of my son, Jaidha's videos.

He and I were talking yesterday, and what I love is how he has mastered these video-editing tools to the point where he can now use them to really tap his inner creativity. So cool. 

Even though I'm not wild about the lyrics (hey, I'm his dad...), I have to say that this is my all-time favorite of my son, Jaidha's videos.

He and I were talking yesterday, and what I love is how he has mastered these video-editing tools to the point where he can now use them to really tap his inner creativity. So cool. ___

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2017-06-23 14:18:39 (1 comments; 9 reshares; 40 +1s; )Open 

Making It Easier for Mere Mortals to Train Machines

Some of you may have read about the recent breakthroughs by DeepMind and OpenAI for making it easier to use human preferences as inputs to machine learning. In this post, I outline some of the implications of these experiments.

There are a number of takeaways, but I think the most compelling is what this new approach could mean for building better AI governance.

#MachineTraining #MachineLearning #ReinforcementLearning

Making It Easier for Mere Mortals to Train Machines

Some of you may have read about the recent breakthroughs by DeepMind and OpenAI for making it easier to use human preferences as inputs to machine learning. In this post, I outline some of the implications of these experiments.

There are a number of takeaways, but I think the most compelling is what this new approach could mean for building better AI governance.

#MachineTraining #MachineLearning #ReinforcementLearning___

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2017-06-21 19:24:24 (2 comments; 6 reshares; 28 +1s; )Open 

Nudging People with AI

Dennis Mortensen, CEO and founder at x.ai writes about using AI to help nudge humanity towards better behavior. This reminds me of something that +Mark Traphagen talks about sometimes, which is User Behavior Modification.

Yes, of course, there is lots of potential for AI to influence us in negative ways (witness the proliferation of fake news, fed in part, by Facebook and other social media algorithms). But there is also great potential for good here too.

The video interview with Mortensen is also worth watching on this page. In it he talks about the degree to which people are willing to forgive technology for problems relative to how easily they forgive people.

For those of you not familiar with x.ai, they make an interesting scheduling service that shows up as a kind of virtual assistant that you communicate with by email.... mehr »

Nudging People with AI

Dennis Mortensen, CEO and founder at x.ai writes about using AI to help nudge humanity towards better behavior. This reminds me of something that +Mark Traphagen talks about sometimes, which is User Behavior Modification.

Yes, of course, there is lots of potential for AI to influence us in negative ways (witness the proliferation of fake news, fed in part, by Facebook and other social media algorithms). But there is also great potential for good here too.

The video interview with Mortensen is also worth watching on this page. In it he talks about the degree to which people are willing to forgive technology for problems relative to how easily they forgive people.

For those of you not familiar with x.ai, they make an interesting scheduling service that shows up as a kind of virtual assistant that you communicate with by email. Interesting approach. ___

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2017-06-19 22:08:37 (2 comments; 5 reshares; 34 +1s; )Open 

As Wisconsin Republicans see it, the lopsided vote totals are incidental smoke, not fire. But the plaintiffs in the Wisconsin case have brought the statistical fire.

Their argument centers on the idea of the “wasted” vote: to win an election in our winner-take-all system you need 50.1 percent of the vote. Any margin above that is wasted. Similarly, all votes cast for the opposing side are wasted, since those people's preferred candidate doesn't make it into office.

This notion was first articulated by a pair of academics in a 2015 paper. In any given election, there are going to be a lot of wasted votes. In a perfectly fair (theoretical) world, those wasted votes would kind of cancel out between the parties. But savvy politicians can draw district lines so that their adversaries waste many more votes.

As Wisconsin Republicans see it, the lopsided vote totals are incidental smoke, not fire. But the plaintiffs in the Wisconsin case have brought the statistical fire.

Their argument centers on the idea of the “wasted” vote: to win an election in our winner-take-all system you need 50.1 percent of the vote. Any margin above that is wasted. Similarly, all votes cast for the opposing side are wasted, since those people's preferred candidate doesn't make it into office.

This notion was first articulated by a pair of academics in a 2015 paper. In any given election, there are going to be a lot of wasted votes. In a perfectly fair (theoretical) world, those wasted votes would kind of cancel out between the parties. But savvy politicians can draw district lines so that their adversaries waste many more votes.___

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2017-06-19 00:06:22 (12 comments; 1 reshares; 80 +1s; )Open 

My son made this walking bear animation for Father's Day. This is part of a longer, more complex video that's too personal to share, but I asked him to give me a cut of just the bear animation. He hand drew each frame by looking at a video of a bear walking.

It's been a nice Father's Day. Cheers to all you fathers out there. We all play a vital role for the future. :)

My son made this walking bear animation for Father's Day. This is part of a longer, more complex video that's too personal to share, but I asked him to give me a cut of just the bear animation. He hand drew each frame by looking at a video of a bear walking.

It's been a nice Father's Day. Cheers to all you fathers out there. We all play a vital role for the future. :)___

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2017-06-17 17:13:41 (12 comments; 0 reshares; 50 +1s; )Open 

Life happens.


Life happens.
___

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2017-06-17 02:12:15 (11 comments; 2 reshares; 37 +1s; )Open 

Lean on me.

Lean on me.___

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2017-06-16 00:48:06 (10 comments; 9 reshares; 40 +1s; )Open 

Homo Deus: A Brief History of Tomorrow (My Notes)

When I run across a book that is worth coming back to later, I often write up notes, and sometimes I share those publicly. That is the case with Yuval Noah Harari’s latest book, Homo Deus: A Brief History of Tomorrow. The book is a follow up to his earlier work, Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind.

These notes will give you a good understanding of what Harari covers, but do nothing to capture the way in which he writes, which is quite engaging. I highly recommend reading this book for yourself.

Homo Deus: A Brief History of Tomorrow (My Notes)

When I run across a book that is worth coming back to later, I often write up notes, and sometimes I share those publicly. That is the case with Yuval Noah Harari’s latest book, Homo Deus: A Brief History of Tomorrow. The book is a follow up to his earlier work, Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind.

These notes will give you a good understanding of what Harari covers, but do nothing to capture the way in which he writes, which is quite engaging. I highly recommend reading this book for yourself.___

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2017-06-14 20:24:21 (11 comments; 1 reshares; 39 +1s; )Open 

Pigeon-Crow

Found this guy on the way to lunch just now. If a pigeon could mate with a crow, this is what I would imagine the offspring would look like. 

Pigeon-Crow

Found this guy on the way to lunch just now. If a pigeon could mate with a crow, this is what I would imagine the offspring would look like. ___

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2017-06-14 18:58:35 (8 comments; 8 reshares; 49 +1s; )Open 

Where are Virtual Personal Assistants Headed?

This is a quick post responding to a nice article from +Mike Elgan on the future of Virtual Personal Assistants. Basically, I'm just agreeing with him and elaborating on what he's saying. In essence, it is this:

In the future, we will bring our own Virtual Personal Assistants to work and they will choose what services we use.

Where are Virtual Personal Assistants Headed?

This is a quick post responding to a nice article from +Mike Elgan on the future of Virtual Personal Assistants. Basically, I'm just agreeing with him and elaborating on what he's saying. In essence, it is this:

In the future, we will bring our own Virtual Personal Assistants to work and they will choose what services we use.___

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2017-06-13 17:04:17 (3 comments; 5 reshares; 23 +1s; )Open 

"Fusing My Religion"

The stories and forms that religion takes are still driving the aspirations we have for AI. What lies behind this strange confluence of narratives? The likeliest explanation is that when we try to describe the ineffable – the singularity, the future itself – even the most secular among us are forced to reach for a familiar metaphysical lexicon. When trying to think about interacting with another intelligence, when summoning that intelligence, and when trying to imagine the future that such an intelligence might foreshadow, we fall back on old cultural habits. The prospect creating an AI invites us to ask about the purpose and meaning of being human: what a human is for in a world where we are not the only workers, not the only thinkers, not the only conscious agents shaping our destiny.

So we use the words our ancestors have used before us.Jus... mehr »

Very interesting new feature in Aeon on AI that also discusses my short fiction The Jesus Singularity: https://aeon.co/essays/why-is-the-language-of-transhumanists-and-religion-so-similar #transhumanism___"Fusing My Religion"

The stories and forms that religion takes are still driving the aspirations we have for AI. What lies behind this strange confluence of narratives? The likeliest explanation is that when we try to describe the ineffable – the singularity, the future itself – even the most secular among us are forced to reach for a familiar metaphysical lexicon. When trying to think about interacting with another intelligence, when summoning that intelligence, and when trying to imagine the future that such an intelligence might foreshadow, we fall back on old cultural habits. The prospect creating an AI invites us to ask about the purpose and meaning of being human: what a human is for in a world where we are not the only workers, not the only thinkers, not the only conscious agents shaping our destiny.

So we use the words our ancestors have used before us. Just as the world was shaped by the word in some traditions, the ‘logos’ of Christian thought, we are shaped by the word, whether we think of ourselves as secular or not. We usher in the AI future on the wings of angels, because the heavy lifting of the imagination isn’t possible without their pinion feathers – whether we think of them as artificial or divine.

Or as REM said it:

Consider this
The hint of the century
Consider this
The slip that brought me
To my knees failed
What if all these fantasies
Come flailing around
Now I've said too much

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2017-06-13 04:27:12 (21 comments; 24 reshares; 136 +1s; )Open 

Of Brains and Machines

This is a nice history of just how much neurons and brains have inspired computer system design, particularly in the field of machine learning. It concludes with an exploration of various attempts to model the brain in silico. 

Of Brains and Machines

This is a nice history of just how much neurons and brains have inspired computer system design, particularly in the field of machine learning. It concludes with an exploration of various attempts to model the brain in silico. ___

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2017-06-13 01:16:41 (25 comments; 29 reshares; 60 +1s; )Open 

Giving Away Your DNA Rights - to Ancestry.com

A few years ago, I ended up using the Ancestry.com website to track down ancestors. My mom was Mormon growing up so we have a pretty rich family history going back pretty far in that service - at least on that side of the family.

So it was with some alarm that I read this rather dense analysis of the Ancestry.com terms of service. If you use the service, you should read this, and then decide whether you are willing to put up with these terms.

Don’t use the AncestryDNA testing service without actually reading the Ancestry.com Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. According to these legal contracts, you still own your DNA, but so does Ancestry.com.
...
To use the AncestryDNA service, customers must consent to the Ancestry.com Privacy Policy and Terms of Service. These are binding legal contracts between thec... mehr »

Giving Away Your DNA Rights - to Ancestry.com

A few years ago, I ended up using the Ancestry.com website to track down ancestors. My mom was Mormon growing up so we have a pretty rich family history going back pretty far in that service - at least on that side of the family.

So it was with some alarm that I read this rather dense analysis of the Ancestry.com terms of service. If you use the service, you should read this, and then decide whether you are willing to put up with these terms.

Don’t use the AncestryDNA testing service without actually reading the Ancestry.com Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. According to these legal contracts, you still own your DNA, but so does Ancestry.com.
...
To use the AncestryDNA service, customers must consent to the Ancestry.com Privacy Policy and Terms of Service. These are binding legal contracts between the customer and Ancestry.com. The most egregious of these terms gives Ancestry.com a free license to exploit your DNA for the rest of time.

Customers must understand that turning over their DNA means a loss of complete ownership and control. Ancestry.com customers should also know they’re giving up the genetic privacy of themselves and their relatives.

Before purchasing, individuals are advised to fully read and consider the Ancestry.com Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. If you become a customer, Ancestry.com owns your DNA for life and longer.


Edit: I think it is important to point to the company's response to these claims are they appear to be taking it quite seriously and have clarified their terms of service. Thanks to +fil smyth​ for pointing this out:
https://www.google.com/amp/s/blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2017/05/21/setting-the-record-straight-ancestry-and-your-dna/amp/


___

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2017-06-13 00:51:49 (7 comments; 1 reshares; 32 +1s; )Open 

What's your take on speed reading?

I'm contemplating investing some time in learning some of these techniques. The general sense I get from some limited research so far is that there is a definite tradeoff with comprehension. In this sense, say a number of sources, it's somewhat comparable to skimming.

Anyone have some personal experience to share?

What's your take on speed reading?

I'm contemplating investing some time in learning some of these techniques. The general sense I get from some limited research so far is that there is a definite tradeoff with comprehension. In this sense, say a number of sources, it's somewhat comparable to skimming.

Anyone have some personal experience to share?___

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2017-06-12 19:42:50 (10 comments; 20 reshares; 37 +1s; )Open 

Brain-Computer Interface: Therapy First, Then Augmentation


The BCP is designed as a fully integrated system to use the brain’s own internal systems and chemistries to pattern and mimic healthy brain behavior, an approach that stands in stark contrast to the current state of the art, which is to simply apply mild electrocution to problematic regions of the brain.
...
Rather than simply disrupting neural circuits, the machine learning systems within the BCP are designed to interpret these signals and intelligently read and write to the surrounding neurons. These capabilities could be used to reestablish any degenerative or trauma-induced damage and perhaps write these memories and skills to other, healthier areas of the brain.

HT +Darius Gabriel Black

Brain-Computer Interface: Therapy First, Then Augmentation


The BCP is designed as a fully integrated system to use the brain’s own internal systems and chemistries to pattern and mimic healthy brain behavior, an approach that stands in stark contrast to the current state of the art, which is to simply apply mild electrocution to problematic regions of the brain.
...
Rather than simply disrupting neural circuits, the machine learning systems within the BCP are designed to interpret these signals and intelligently read and write to the surrounding neurons. These capabilities could be used to reestablish any degenerative or trauma-induced damage and perhaps write these memories and skills to other, healthier areas of the brain.

HT +Darius Gabriel Black___

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